Weapons of the Trench War, 1914-1918

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Sutton, 1999 - History - 174 pages
Before 1914, trench warfare was a type of fighting unforeseen by the armies of Britain, France and Germany, so none was equipped to fight it. Specialized weapons and equipment were needed for the violent environment of the trenches and these had to be developed and introduced to the Front as quickly as possible. In Britain, a plethora of inventions departments sprang up to address the problem and from these there emerged a number of remarkable weapons, although some came from civilians such as William Mills and Wilfrid Stokes. Hand and rifle grenades as well as trench mortars emerged as potent weapons that had a fundamental impact on the conduct of the fighting in the trenches.

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About the author (1999)

Anthony Saunders is the John M. Schiff Professor of Finance and the Chair of the Department of Finance at the Stern School of Business at New York University. Professor Saunders received his PhD from the London School of Economics and has taught both undergraduate and graduate level courses at NYU since 1978. Throughout his academic career, his teaching and research have specialized in financial institutions and international banking. He has served as a visiting professor all over the world, including INSEAD, the Stockholm School of Economics, and the University of Melbourne. He is currently on the Executive Committee of the Salomon Center for the Study of Financial Institutions, NYU. His research has been published in all the major money and banking and finance journals and in several books. In addition, he has authored or co-authored several professional books, the most recent of which is Credit Risk Measurement: New Approaches to Value at Risk and Other Paradigms, John Wiley and Sons, New York, 1999

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