Maggot Moon

Front Cover
Candlewick Press, 2013 - Juvenile Fiction - 279 pages
2 Reviews
A 2014 Michael L. Printz Honor Book

In Sally Gardner's stunning novel, set in a ruthless regime, an unlikely teenager risks all to expose the truth about a heralded moon landing.


What if the football hadn't gone over the wall. On the other side of the wall there is a dark secret. And the devil. And the Moon Man. And the Motherland doesn't want anyone to know. But Standish Treadwell — who has different-colored eyes, whocan't read, can't write, Standish Treadwell isn't bright — sees things differently than the rest of the "train-track thinkers." So when Standish and his only friend and neighbor, Hector, make their way to the other side of the wall, they see what the Motherland has been hiding. And it's big...One hundred very short chapters, told in an utterly original first-person voice, propel readers through a narrative that is by turns gripping and darkly humorous, bleak and chilling, tender and transporting.
 

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A book to challenge the reader. There is the story, and then there is the style in which the story is told. The description of the book is straightforward, but the magic lies within the unconventional structure, which is unsettling and yet propels the action that unfolds with a necessary energy. The information about the author's dyslexia is interesting and curious. The whole time I spent reading this book, I sensed I was being shown a perspective of reality through the eyes of one who sees things differently. There are short declarative chapters. There are quirky illustrations that uncannily accompany the narrative. There are snatches of recognizable themes that are all mixed up together, that keep the reader speculating. The simplicity of the plot belies the potency of the story. All of these factors factors fuel an offbeat reading experience of a world in turmoil. In the end, this is a hero's journey. Meet Standish. Find out for yourself. Let me know what you think about this book. It is a book that is ripe for discussion in as much for the themes as for the writing style. My sense is that I've just visited a parallel world that is frighteningly possible. Maggot Moon is a cautionary tale, the result of society making a few too many wrong turns, or failed corrections. Read as an ARC. A book that came to mind while reading this was Genesis by Bernard Beckett. Two blogs posts: 1-http://arepreading.tumblr.com/post/43148557735/maggotmoon and 2-http://arepreading.tumblr.com/post/53367800641/candlewick-titles-sweep-british-book-awards 

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
5
Section 2
13
Section 3
37
Section 4
43
Section 5
46
Section 6
50
Section 7
52
Section 8
53
Section 24
153
Section 25
154
Section 26
155
Section 27
157
Section 28
158
Section 29
159
Section 30
176
Section 31
178

Section 9
58
Section 10
63
Section 11
87
Section 12
89
Section 13
93
Section 14
95
Section 15
99
Section 16
103
Section 17
107
Section 18
109
Section 19
118
Section 20
141
Section 21
145
Section 22
147
Section 23
149
Section 32
185
Section 33
208
Section 34
221
Section 35
225
Section 36
226
Section 37
231
Section 38
235
Section 39
237
Section 40
241
Section 41
247
Section 42
252
Section 43
265
Section 44
267
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

Sally Gardner is an award-winning author whose novels have sold more than 1.5 million copies in the U.K. and have been translated into twenty-two languages. She is dyslexic and is an avid spokesperson for dyslexia. "I strongly believe that dyslexia is like a Rubik’s Cube," she says. "It takes time to work out how to deal with it, but once you do, it can be the most wonderful gift." Sally Gardner lives in London.

Julian Crouch is a director and designer whose career has spanned theater, opera, film, and television. He is currently designing Big Fish for Broadway and Cinderella for the Dutch National Ballet. Julian Crouch lives in Brooklyn, New York.

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