The Mothman Prophecies

Front Cover
Macmillan, Feb 18, 2002 - Body, Mind & Spirit - 272 pages
5 Reviews
West Virginia, 1966. For thirteen months the town of Point Pleasant is gripped by a real-life nightmare that culminates in a strategy that makes headlines around the world. Strange occurrences and sightings, including a bizarre winged apparition that becomes known as the Mothman, trouble this ordinary American community. Mysterious lights are seen moving across the sky. Domestic animals are found slaughtered and mutilated. And journalist John Keel, arriving to investigate the freakish events, soon finds himself an integral part of an eerie and unfathomable mystery...
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
0
4 stars
1
3 stars
3
2 stars
0
1 star
1

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - trivigo - LibraryThing

This is a mixed bag, in terms of its reading value. Keel calls himself a Fortean writer and one can see that in this book. Forteanism purports to be anti-theory. It presents itself as an even more ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - stephmo - LibraryThing

John Keel follows that rather dangerous path of conspiracy theorists - calling out and explaining the shenanigans and trickery of the fakers, explaining the logical explanation behind things ... Read full review

Contents

1 Beelzebub Visits West Virginia
1
IheCreepWhoCameinfmmtheCold
11
The Flutter of Black Wings
26
Take the Train
39
TheCold WhoCameDownintheRain
50
Mothman _
58
The Night of the Bleeding Ear
73
Pmcession of the Damned
86
Games Nonpeople Play
151
Phantom Photographers
172
Sideways in Time
183
Misery on the Mount
198
Paranoiacs Are Made Not Born
216
Even the Bedouins Hate Their Telephone Company
232
Something Awful Is Going to Happen
245
Where the Birds Gather
257

Wake Up Down Ihere
103
Purple Lights and April Foolishness
122
If This is Wednesday It Must Be a
140
Afterword
269
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2002)

JOHN A. KEEL was a prominent journalist and UFOlogist, credited with coining the term “Men in Black.” He died in 2009.

Bibliographic information