My Country Versus Me: The First-Hand Account by the Los Alamos Scientist Who Was Falsely Accused of Being a Spy

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Hyperion Books, Jan 8, 2003 - Biography & Autobiography - 352 pages
10 Reviews
Wen Ho Lee, a patriotic American scientist born in Taiwan, devoted most of his life to science and to helping improve U.S. defense capabilities at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Then, in January of 1999, everything changed and he was accused of espionage by members of Congress and portrayed as the most dangerous traitor since the Rosenbergs. He was even told that their fate--execution--might well be his own. For the first time, Dr. Wen Ho Lee chronicles his experiences before, during, and after his imprisonment. He takes you inside Los Alamos, describes the false charges leveled against him, and tells how his career and life were threatened and his civil rights taken away. A riveting true story about prejudice, suspicion, and courage, My Country Versus Me is a vitally important book for our time.

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Review: My Country Versus Me: The First-Hand Account by the Los Alamos Scientist Who Was Falsely Accused of Being a Spy

User Review  - Amanda - Goodreads

So I grew up in the 90s in an apolitical bubble. Little did I know, that across the country, Wen Ho Lee was being held in solitary confinement for the government's imposition that his back up data ... Read full review

Review: My Country Versus Me: The First-Hand Account by the Los Alamos Scientist Who Was Falsely Accused of Being a Spy

User Review  - Adam - Goodreads

Wen Ho Lee's account of one of the uglier moments of the Clinton Administration is a story of multiple dysfunctional institutions. There's the bureaucratic dysfunction at Los Alamos National ... Read full review

References to this book

About the author (2003)

Wen Ho Lee lives with his wife in Los Alamos, New Mexico.

Helen Zia, an award-winning journalist and author of Asian American Dreams, has covered Asian American communities and social and political movements for more than twenty years. Born in New Jersey and a graduate of Princeton's first co-educational class, she lives in the San Francisco Bay area.

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