Theology of John Calvin

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Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, Nov 1, 1995 - Biography & Autobiography - 424 pages
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Though Karl Barth wrote his lectures on John Calvin more than seventy years ago, the wrestling of one theological giant with another can hardly fail to be exciting and instructive. Delivered at the University of Gottingen in 1922, Barth's lectures offer a brilliant theological analysis of the Reformation of Calvin in particular while at the same time providing vital insights into the development of the theologian Barth himself. Barth's lectures open with an illuminating sketch of medieval theology, an appreciation of Luther's breakthrough, and a comparative study of the roles of Zwingli and Calvin. The main portion of the lectures consists of an increasingly sympathetic, and at times amusing, account of Calvin's life up to his recall to Geneva. In the process, Barth examines and evaluates the early theological writings of Calvin, especially the 1536 edition of the"Institutes.""
 

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Contents

VII
13
VIII
14
IX
25
X
50
XI
69
XII
70
XIII
90
XIV
103
XXXV
284
XXXVI
293
XXXVII
306
XXXVIII
307
XXXIX
309
XL
317
XLI
320
XLII
322

XV
129
XVI
133
XVII
146
XVIII
157
XIX
162
XX
172
XXI
177
XXII
187
XXIII
194
XXIV
210
XXV
214
XXVI
216
XXVII
226
XXVIII
234
XXIX
243
XXX
248
XXXI
258
XXXII
264
XXXIV
271
XLIII
323
XLIV
331
XLV
337
XLVI
346
XLVII
347
XLVIII
350
XLIX
356
L
365
LI
366
LII
369
LIII
375
LIV
385
LV
386
LVI
393
LVII
402
LVIII
410
LIX
418
LX
423
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About the author (1995)

(1886 1968) Karl Barth was professor of dogmatic theology at the University of Basel, Switzerland. He is considered by some to be the greatest Protestant theologian of the twentieth century and possibly the greatest since the Reformation. Among his most famous works are Church Dogmatics and The Epistle to the Romans.

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