Women, the Family, and Freedom: 1750-1880

Front Cover
Stanford University Press, 1983 - Social Science - 561 pages
This is the first book in a two-part collection of 264 primary source documents from the Enlightenment to 1950 chronicling the public debate that raged in Europe and America over the role of women in Western society. The present volume looks at the period from 1750 to 1880. The central issues motherhood, women's legal position in the family, equality of the sexes, the effect on social stability of women's education and labor extended to women the struggle by men for personal and political liberty.

These issues were political, economic, and religious dynamite. They exploded in debates of philosophers, political theorists, scientists, novelists, and religious and political leaders. This collection emphasizes the debate by juxtaposing prevailing and dissenting points of view at given historical moments (e.g. Madame de Staël vs. Rousseau, Eleanor Marx vs. Pope Leo XIII, Strindberg vs. Ibsen, Simone de Beauvoir vs. Margaret Mead). Each section is preceded by a contextual headnote pinpointing the documents significance. Many of the documents have been translated into English for the first time.

 

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Contents

General Introduction
1
Women and the Rights of Man in the Age
13
Male Authority in Marriage
24
Woman as Wife in the Wake of the French Revolution
37
Intellectual Women Reject Rousseaus View of Womans Role
50
Educating Women for Citizenship in the New Nations
71
Rethinking Female Education after the Revolutions
83
Rights for Women
97
Evolution Education and Economics
359
From Romantic Idealism
367
Giuseppe Mazzini Italy 1860
385
John Ruskin England 1865
387
Ending the Subjection of Women
391
John Stuart Mill England 1869
392
Margaret Oliphant England 1869
399
The Lancet England 1869
404

German Responses to the Revolutionary Debate on Womens Role and Rights
110
The British Debate on Womens Role in the Family and the State
119
Women and Their Sphere in the Romantic Era
133
The Dialogue Reopens on Marriage and Womens Legal
142
Women Demand Legal Reforms in Marriage
158
Perspectives on Education Influence and Control
164
Schooling and Social Function
173
Womans Sphere and Womens Work American Women Debate Womens Public Rights and Duties
180
Catharine Beecher 1837
181
Etienne Cabet 1841
187
French Social Theorists Insist on Womans Private Sphere 52 PierreJoseph Proudhon 1846
190
British Women Disagree on the Boundaries of Womans Sphere
192
Sarah Stickney Ellis England 1843
193
Marion Kirkland Reid Scotland 1843
195
The Problem of Women in the Work Force
199
Jane Dubuisson France 1834
201
National Trades Union Committee on Female Labor United States 1836
202
LAtelier France 1842
204
Elizabeth Gaskell England 1848
208
Solutions to the Problem of Women in the Work Force
209
National Trades Union Committee on Female Labor United States 1836
210
Flora Tristan France 1843
212
Friedrich Engels Germany 1844 21
215
Enshrining Woman on the Patriarchal Pedestal
218
Auguste Comte France 1839
219
Auguste Comte France 1848
221
Men Women and Political Rights Before 1848
227
R J Richardson England 1840
229
LAtelier France 1844
230
The MiddleClass Discussion of Woman Suffrage 67 Womans Rights and Duties England 1840
231
Marion Kirkland Reid Scotland 1843
233
Women Revolution and Reaction
239
Womens Political Consciousness in a Revolutionary Age Revolutionary Visions in Continental Europe
245
Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels 1848
246
Jeanne Deroin France 1848
247
Womens Fate in the French Revolution of 1848
248
Décret sur les clubs 1848
249
Anne Knight 1848
250
Revolutionary Visions in America
251
Declaration of Sentiments 1848
252
Newspaper Reports on the Seneca Falls Convention 1848
255
Elizabeth Cady Stanton 1848
259
Womens Political Action in the Face of Repression
279
Repression and Reaction
285
Women Demand Civil Law Reform
299
Legal Reform and the Scandinavian Novel
314
Europe
324
French Writers Fuel the International Debate
335
The Debate Reaches Russia
350
Edouard de Pompéry France 1870
405
A Reply to John Stuart Mill United States 1870
406
Evolution Science and the Subjection of Women
408
Charles Darwin England 1871
409
Paul Broca France 1873
411
Herbert Spencer England 1876
412
New Controversies over Womens Education University Education for Englishwomen
416
Emily Davies 1868
417
Anne Jemima Clough 1873
423
Sex and Education
425
Edward H Clarke United States 1873
427
Caroline Healey Dall United States 1874
431
Elizabeth Garrett Anderson England 1874
433
State Secondary Education for Frenchwomen
438
Monseigneur Dupanloup 1867
440
Emile Keller 1880
442
Camille Sée 1880
443
Women and the Civil
445
Carlo Francesco Gabba 1861
446
A New Code for a Unified Italy 123 Anna Maria Mozzoni 1864
447
Attacks on the Civil Code in France
448
Léon Richer 1877
450
The First International Congress on Womens Rights 1878
453
Women Work and the Professions
456
Jules Simon 1861
457
JulieVictoire Daubié 1866
459
Women and the Work Force in Germany
462
Joseph Heinrichs 1866
463
Louise Otto 1866
464
The First International and Working Women
466
First International Workingmens Association Geneva Congress 1866
467
First International Workingmens Association Lausanne Congress 1867
469
Paule Mink France 1868
470
The British Controversy over Women in Medicine
474
Sophia JexBlake 1869
475
Frances and George Hoggan 1884
478
Women and the Vote The Second British Reform BillShould Women be Included? 135 John Stuart Mill 1867
482
The Debate in the House of Commons 1867
488
The Fifteenth Amendment Votes for Black Men Only?
493
Elizabeth Cady Stanton 1869
494
Wendell Phillips 1869
500
German Unification and Political Rights for Women
504
Hedwig Dohm 1873
505
Jenny Hirsch 187374
508
The Suffrage Issue in Republican France
510
Léon Richer 1877
511
Hubertine Auclert 1878
512
Hubertine Auclert 1879
515
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