The Key to the Asian Miracle: Making Shared Growth Credible

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Brookings Institution, 1996 - Business & Economics - 198 pages
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"Easily the most informed and comprehensive analysis to date on how and why East Asian countries have achieved sustained high economic growth rates, [this book] substantially advances our understanding of the key interactions between the governors and governed in the development process. Students and practitioners alike will be referring to Campos and Root's series of excellent case studies for years to come." Richard L. Wilson, The Asia Foundation

Eight countries in East Asia--Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore, Thailand, Malaysia, and Indonesia--have become known as the "East Asian miracle" because of their economies' dramatic growth. In these eight countries real per capita GDP rose twice as fast as in any other regional grouping between 1965 and 1990. Even more impressive is their simultaneous significant reduction in poverty and income inequality. Their success is frequently attributed to economic policies, but the authors of this book argue that those economic policies would not have worked unless the leaders of the countries made them credible to their business communities and citizens.

Jose Edgardo Campos and Hilton Root challenge the popular belief that East Asia's high performers grew rapidly because they were ruled by authoritarian leaders. They show that these leaders had to collaborate with various sectors of their population to create an environment that was conducive to sustained growth. This required them to persuade the business community that their investments would not be expropriated and to convince the broader population that their short-term sacrifices would be rewarded in the future. Many of the countries achieved business cooperation by creating consultative groups, which the authors call deliberation councils, to enhance accountability and stability. They also obtained popular support through a variety of wealth-sharing measures such as land reform, worker cooperatives, and wider access to education.

Finally, to inhibit favoritism and corruption that would benefit narrow interest groups at the expense of broad-based development, these countries' leaders constructed a competent bureaucracy that balanced autonomy with accountability to serve all interests, including the poor.

This important book provides useful lessons about how developing and newly industrialized countries can build institutions to implement growth-promoting policies.

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Contents

East Asias Road to High Growth
1
The Rise of East Asia in Comparative
7
Leadership and the Principle of Shared Growth
28
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About the author (1996)

Jose Edgardo Campos is adviser to the vice president on governance and political economy and practice manager for governance at the World Bank Institute. Previously, he was governance adviser for Bangladesh at the World Bank in Dhaka and lead public sector specialist and the coordinator of the Bank's governance and anticorruption thematic group. Hilton L. Rootis a professor at George Mason University's School of Public Policy and a senior fellow with the Mercatus Center. He has served as adviser to the U.S. Treasury and the Asian Development Bank and has taught at Stanford University and the University of Pennsylvania. Root has a number of books to his credit, including Capital & Collusion: The Political Logic of Global Economic Development(Princeton, 2006), and Governing for Prosperity, edited with Bruce Bueno de Mesquita (Yale, 2000).

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