George Washington Carver: In His Own Words

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University of Missouri Press, Feb 1, 1991 - Biography & Autobiography - 224 pages
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George Washington Carver (1864-1943), best known for his work as a scientist and a botanist, was an anomaly in his own time—a black man praised by white America.

This selection of his letters and other writings reveals both the human side of Carver and the forces that shaped his creative genius. They show us a Carver who was both manipulated and manipulative who had inner tensions and anxieties. But perhaps more than anything else, these letters allow us to see Carver's deep love for his fellow man, whether manifested in his efforts to treat polio victims in the 1930s or in his incredibly intense and emotionally charged friendships that lasted a lifetime.

The editor has furnished commentary between letters to set them in context.

 

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Contents

Carverthe Man and the Myth
1
Carvers SelfImage over Time
19
Old Friends Remembered
39
Carver and His Coworkers
60
Carver and His Students
84
Helping the Man Farthest Down
102
Reading God out of Natures Great Book
127
Black Man in White America
148
9 Carver and His Boys
171
Notes
197
Index
206
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About the author (1991)

Gary R. Kremer is Executive Director of The State Historical Society of Missouri. He is the author and editor of numerous works, including James Milton Turner and the Promise of America: The Public Life of a Post-Civil War Black Leader; Missouri's Black Heritage, Revised Edition; and George Washington Carver: In His Own Words (all University of Missouri Press). He lives in Jefferson City, Missouri.

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