Indian Herbalogy of North America, Volume 973

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Shambhala, 1991 - Health & Fitness - 382 pages
For more than twenty years this pioneering work had served as a bible for herbalists throughout the world. It is an illustrated encyclopedic guide to more than two hundred medicinal plants found in North America, with descriptions of each plant's appearance and uses, and directions for methods of use and dosage. Native American traditions are compared with traditional uses of the same plants among other cultures where the science of herbs has flourished, particularly in Russia and China. Included is an annotated bibliography of pertinent books and periodicals.

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The book, Indian Herbalogy of North America by Alma Hutchens is a plagiary. It is a copy taken from older herbals. Most of the plagiarized material comes from two older books in particular. One of the copied books is a little known herbal from the 19th century called, The Complete Herbalist, by Dr. O. Phelps Brown. The 2nd work that was plagiarized was the more famous herbals by Maude Grieve.
I will give you an example: Mandrake, American Podophyllum peltatum
Hutchens writes under uses, "The influence is exercised on every part of the system, stimulating the glands to a healthy action, releasing obstructions such as bilious and typhoid febrile disease. In chronic liver disease it has no equal in the whole range of herbal practice. For all chronic scrofulous, dyspeptic complaints it is highly valuable acting upon the bowels without disposing them to subsequent costiveness...Its most beneficial action is obtained by the use of small doses frequently..."
Maude Grieve writes in 1931, "Podophyllum is a powerful medicine, exercising an influence on every part of the system, stimulating the glands to healthy action. It is highly valuable in dropsy, biliousness, dyspepsia, liver and other disorders...Its most beneficial action is obtained by the use of small doses frequently given."
Dr. O Phelps Brown writes in 1875, " As a deobstruent it has no superior, acting through and upon all the tissues of the system...In bilious and typhoid febrile diseases it is very valuable as an emeto-catharic, breaking up the disease quickly. In chronic liver disease it has no equal in the whole range of medicine...In constipation it acts upon the bowels without disposing them to subsequent costiveness."
 

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About the author (1991)

Alma R. Hutchens, a close associate of the late herbalist N. G. Tretchikoff, has been a student and practitioner of herbal medicine for many years.

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