How Can Mankind Find the Christ Again?

Front Cover
SteinerBooks, 1984 - Religion - 182 pages

8 lectures, Basel and Dornach, December 22, 1918 - January 1, 1919 (CW 187)

"This is the goal toward which mankind strives through the new wisdom, in the new spirit: To find in the spirit itself the power to overcome egotism and the falseness of life, to overcome self-seeking through love, the sham of life through truth, illness through health-giving thoughts that put us into immediate accord with the harmonies of the universe, because they flow from the harmonies of the harmonies of the universe" (Rudolf Steiner).

Steiner examines the inner history of Christianity, explaining its relationship to ancient Judaism, Hellenism, Romanism, Gnosticism, and Egypto-Chaldean initiation. He describes the hidden spiritual battle raging today and the need for a renewal of the mysteries in a modern form.

Today's road to Christ must involve a new, formative thinking whose Christian character is shown in the advent of selflessness, health, and a sense for truth. George O'Neil describes the nature of these lectures in his foreword: "As always, Rudolf Steiner spoke freely without using notes. Most of his audience had studied--or were at least familiar with--his written works and the published lecture cycles on the Gospels and related themes. A similar background will be needed for reading How Can Mankind Find the Christ Again? Such a background will prepare the reader for challenges and vistas not encountered elsewhere. Steiner's message of the new Christ Light midst the shadow existence of our age speaks to the modern soul in search of a cognitive reach"

How Can Mankind Find the Christ Again? is a translation of Wie kan die Menschheit den Christus wiederfinden? Das dreifache Schattendasein unserer Zeit und das neue Christus-Licht (GA 187).

 

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My full review of this book is at: http://www.doyletics.com/arj/howcanma.htm
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Contents

December 221918 1
22
December 291918
101
December 311918
129
January 11919
155
Notes
181
Copyright

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About the author (1984)

Austrian-born Rudolf Steiner was a noted Goethe (see Vol. 2) scholar and private student of the occult who became involved with Theosophy in Germany in 1902, when he met Annie Besant (1847--1933), a devoted follower of Madame Helena P. Blavatsky (1831--1891). In 1912 he broke with the Theosophists because of what he regarded as their oriental bias and established a system of his own, which he called Anthroposophy (anthro meaning "man"; sophia sophia meaning "wisdom"), a "spiritual science" he hoped would restore humanism to a materialistic world. In 1923 he set up headquarters for the Society of Anthroposophy in New York City. Steiner believed that human beings had evolved to the point where material existence had obscured spiritual capacities and that Christ had come to reverse that trend and to inaugurate an age of spiritual reintegration. He advocated that education, art, agriculture, and science be based on spiritual principles and infused with the psychic powers he believed were latent in everyone. The world center of the Anhthroposophical Society today is in Dornach, Switzerland, in a building designed by Steiner. The nonproselytizing society is noted for its schools.

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