Materialism and the Task of Anthroposophy: Seventeen Lectures Given in Dornach Between April 2 and June 5, 1921

Front Cover
SteinerBooks, 1987 - Religion - 352 pages

17 lectures, Dornach, April 2 - June 5, 1921 (CW 204)

In this history of human consciousness, Steiner explains that the world ended in A.D. 300, when it became impossible to find spirit in nature. Since then, we have been living in an increasingly spiritual world on a disintegrating, dying Earth. Although people have been asleep to the spiritual reality that surrounds us, Steiner shows a way out of today's blind materialism that takes us toward a new spiritual perception and knowledge, which is the only way that we will find the Christ in our time.

In these important lectures, Steiner also talks about the true nature of numbers, they Mystery of the Grail, and the development of materialism. We need to let go of materialism now that it has fulfilled its task of making us true citizens of Earth. Through spiritual science, we must now be come citizens of the spiritual world.

This volume is a translation from German of Der Mensch in Zusammenhang mit dem Kosmos 4: Perspektiven der Menschheitsentwickelung. Der materialistische Erkenntnisimpuls und die Aufgaben der Anthroposophie (GA 204).

 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

James Cameron
Important book (a must read)

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

My full review of this book is at: http://www.doyletics.com/arj/matrvw.htm
Bobby Matherne

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 2 - And it would really be of no help to mankind at all if by some divine decree or the like it could be protected from having to undergo these low levels of existence. In order for human beings to attain to full use of their powers of freedom, it is absolutely necessary that they descend to the low levels in their world conception as well as in their life.

About the author (1987)

Austrian-born Rudolf Steiner was a noted Goethe (see Vol. 2) scholar and private student of the occult who became involved with Theosophy in Germany in 1902, when he met Annie Besant (1847--1933), a devoted follower of Madame Helena P. Blavatsky (1831--1891). In 1912 he broke with the Theosophists because of what he regarded as their oriental bias and established a system of his own, which he called Anthroposophy (anthro meaning "man"; sophia sophia meaning "wisdom"), a "spiritual science" he hoped would restore humanism to a materialistic world. In 1923 he set up headquarters for the Society of Anthroposophy in New York City. Steiner believed that human beings had evolved to the point where material existence had obscured spiritual capacities and that Christ had come to reverse that trend and to inaugurate an age of spiritual reintegration. He advocated that education, art, agriculture, and science be based on spiritual principles and infused with the psychic powers he believed were latent in everyone. The world center of the Anhthroposophical Society today is in Dornach, Switzerland, in a building designed by Steiner. The nonproselytizing society is noted for its schools.

Bibliographic information