Murder in the Afternoon

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Macmillan, Feb 11, 2014 - Fiction - 400 pages
2 Reviews

An intricate plot in the post-WWI English countryside and Frances Brody's "refreshingly complex heroine" (Kirkus) combine in Murder in the Afternoon, an absorbing mystery.

Dead one minute...

Young Harriet and her brother Austin have always been scared of the quarry where their stone mason father works. So when they find him dead on the cold ground, they rush off quickly to look for some help.

Alive the next?

When help arrives, however, the quarry is deserted and there is no sign of the body. Were the children mistaken? Is their father not dead? Did he simply get up and run away?

A sinister disappearing act

It seems like another unusual case requiring the expertise of Kate Shackleton--and Mary Jane, the children's mother, is adamant that only she can help. But Mary Jane is hiding something--a secret from Kate's past that raises the stakes and puts both Kate and her family at risk.

 

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Very good murder mystery with lots of action. Love the heroine of this book and series with a little wit, nosiness and lots of courage who never gives up. Love the kindness of her heart and thoughtfulness.

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
9
Section 3
25
Section 4
34
Section 5
52
Section 6
61
Section 7
105
Section 8
135
Section 17
265
Section 18
273
Section 19
288
Section 20
294
Section 21
298
Section 22
305
Section 23
308
Section 24
313

Section 9
143
Section 10
155
Section 11
173
Section 12
184
Section 13
197
Section 14
205
Section 15
214
Section 16
232
Section 25
318
Section 26
339
Section 27
354
Section 28
357
Section 29
364
Section 30
381
Copyright

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About the author (2014)

FRANCES BRODY is the author of Dying in the Wool, A Medal for Murder, and Murder in the Afternoon. She lives in the North of England, where she was born and grew up. Frances started her writing life in radio, with many plays and short stories broadcast by the BBC. She has also written for television and theatre. Her one woman play Jehad was nominated for a Time Out award. Before turning to crime, she wrote historical sagas under her real name, winning the HarperCollins Elizabeth Elgin award for most regionally evocative debut saga of the millennium.