Same Kind of Different as Me

Front Cover
Thorndike Press, 2010 - Biography & Autobiography - 407 pages
269 Reviews

A dangerous, homeless drifter who grew up picking cotton in virtual slavery.

An upscale art dealer accustomed to the world of Armani and Chanel.

A gutsy woman with a stubborn dream.

A story so incredible no novelist would dare dream it.

It begins outside a burning plantation hut in Louisiana . . . and an East Texas honky-tonk . . . and, without a doubt, in the heart of God. It unfolds in a Hollywood hacienda . . . an upscale New York gallery . . . a downtown dumpster . . . a Texas ranch.

Gritty with pain and betrayal and brutality, this true story also shines with an unexpected, life-changing love.

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Review: Same Kind of Different As Me

User Review  - nonna - Christianbook.com

This is a true story told by the men who authored this book. The story goes back and forth between them. Denver grew up in Louisiana. He and his family were sharecroppers and picked cotton, shopped at ... Read full review

Review: Same Kind of Different As Me

User Review  - Nellie Dee - Christianbook.com

This story is about two men (Ron Hall and Denver Moore) and and how their lives came together through the impact of one woman's dream and faith. Her love and compassion transformed the homeless living ... Read full review

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About the author (2010)

Nicholas Tomalin was literary editor for the "New Stateman" and a featured columnist for the "Daily Express," the "Sunday Times," and the "Evening Standard" of London. He was nominated Reporter of the Year for his coverage of the war in Vietnam.

Ron Hall is a leading British journalist. He was cofounder of the "Sunday Times"' (London) "Insight," where he was editor from 1964 - 66, and he became joint managing editor of the "Sunday Times" in 1969.

Jonathan Raban is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, the editor of "The Oxford Book of the Sea," and author of ten critically acclaimed books, including "Passage to Juneau," He is the winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Heinemann Award for Literature, and received the "New York Times" Editors' Choice for Book of the Year for "Old Glory" and "Bad Land," He has been called (by "The Guardian") "the finest writer afloat since Conrad.

Denver Moore was born in rural Louisiana in January 1937. He eventually went to live on a plantation in Red River Parish with his uncle and aunt, who were share croppers. Around 1960, he hopped a freight train and began a life as a homeless drifter until 1966 when a judge sentenced him to 10 years in Angola Prison. He was released in 1976 and spent the next 22 years homeless on the streets of Fort Worth, Texas. During this time, he would occasionally ride the rails visiting cities and hobo jungles across America. He met Miss Debbie in 1998 and his life changed. He became an artist, public speaker, and volunteer for homeless causes. In 2006, was named Philanthropist of the Year by the citizens of Fort Worth for his work with homeless people at the Union Gospel Mission. He was also the co-author of Same Kind of Different As Me: A Modern-Day Slave, an International Art Dealer, and the Unlikely Woman Who Bound Them Together with Ron Hall and Lynn Vincent. He died on March 31, 2012 at the age of 75.

Lynn Vincent is the "New York Times" best-selling writer of "Heaven Is for Real "and "Same Kind of Different As Me. "The author or coauthor of ten books, Lynn has sold 12 million copies since 2006. She worked for eleven years as a writer and editor at the national news biweekly "WORLD" magazine and is a U.S. Navy veteran.

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