Encyclopedia of Measurement and Statistics, Volume 1

Front Cover
Neil J. Salkind
SAGE, 2007 - Social Science - 1136 pages
"The study of measurement and statistics can be less than inviting. However, in fields as varying as education, politics, and health care, assessment and the use of measurement and statistics have become integral parts of almost every activity undertaken. These activities require the organization of ideas, the generation of hypotheses, the collection of data, and the interpretation, illustration, and analysis of data. No matter where educated people look, this critical analysis is more important than ever in an age where information - and lots of it - is readily available. The Encyclopedia of Measurement and Statistics presents state-of-the-art information and ready-to-use facts from the fields of measurement and statistics in an unintimidating style. The ideas and tools contained in these pages are approachable and can be invaluable for understanding our very technical world and the increasing flow of information. Although there are references that cover statistics and assessment in depth, none provides as comprehensive a resource in as focused and accessible a manner as the two volumes of this encyclopedia. Through approximately 500 contributions, experts provide an overview and an explanation of the major topics in these two areas. Key Features Covers every major facet of these two different, but highly integrated disciplines - from mean, mode, and median to reliability, validity, significance, correlation, and much more - all without overwhelming the informed reader Offers cross-disciplinary coverage, with contributions from and applications to the fields of Psychology, Education, Sociology, Human Development, Political Science, Business and Management, Public Health, and others Provides cross-reference terms, a brief listing of further readings, and Web site URLs following most entries, as well as an extensive set of appendices and an annotated list of organizations relevant to measurement and statistics Appendices Features Appendix A is a guide to basic statistics for those readers who might like an instructional step-by-step presentation of basic concepts in statistics and measurement Appendix B is a table of critical values used in hypothesis testing and an important part of any reference in this area Appendix C represents a collection of some important and useful measurement and statistics Internet sites A primary goal of creating this set of volumes is to open up the broad discipline of measurement and statistics to a wider and more general audience than usual. Edited by bestselling author Neil J. Salkind, this encyclopedia is specifically designed to appeal to beginning and intermediate-level students, practitioners, researchers, and consumers of information. It is a welcome addition to any academic library." http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0657/2006011888-d.html.
 

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Contents

A
1
B
69
C
117
D
217
E
F
G
Index
P
Index
Volume 3
Q
R
S
T
U

Volume 2
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
V
W
Z
Ten Commandments of Data Collection
Internet Sites About Statistics
Glossary
Master Bibliography
Index
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Neil J. Salkind received his PhD in human development from the University of Maryland, and after teaching for 35 years at the University of Kansas, he was Professor Emeritus in the Department of Psychology and Research in Education, where he collaborated with colleagues and work with students. His early interests were in the area of children’s cognitive development, and after research in the areas of cognitive style and (what was then known as) hyperactivity, he was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of North Carolina’s Bush Center for Child and Family Policy. His work then changed direction to focus on child and family policy, specifically the impact of alternative forms of public support on various child and family outcomes. He delivered more than 150 professional papers and presentations; written more than 100 trade and textbooks; and is the author of Statistics for People Who (Think They) Hate Statistics (SAGE), Theories of Human Development (SAGE), and Exploring Research (Prentice Hall). He has edited several encyclopedias, including the Encyclopedia of Human Development, the Encyclopedia of Measurement and Statistics, and the Encyclopedia of Research Design. He was editor of Child Development Abstracts and Bibliography for 13 years. He lived in Lawrence, Kansas, where he liked to read, swim with the River City Sharks, work as the proprietor and sole employee of big boy press, bake brownies (see www.statisticsforpeople.com for the recipe), and poke around old Volvos and old houses.


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