The Third Bullet: A Bob Lee Swagger Novel

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Simon and Schuster, Jan 15, 2013 - Fiction - 485 pages
8 Reviews
A blockbuster alternate narrative to one of the most enduring controversies of our time: The assassination of John F. Kennedy. This time, Bob Lee Swagger is on the case.

Bob Lee Swagger is back in a thriller fifty years in the making . . .

It’s not even a clue. It’s a whisper, a trace, a ghost echo, drifting down through the decades via chance connections so fragile that they would disintegrate in the puff of a breath. But it’s enough to get legendary former Marine sniper Bob Lee Swagger interested in the events of November 22, 1963, and the third bullet that so decisively ended the life of John F. Kennedy and set the stage for one of the most enduring controversies of our time.

Swagger begins his slow night stalk through a much-traveled landscape. But he’s asking questions that few have asked before: Why did the third bullet explode? Why did Lee Harvey Oswald, about to become the most hunted man on earth, risk it all by returning to his rooming house to secure a pistol he easily could have brought with him? How could a conspiracy that went unpenetrated for fifty years have been thrown together in the two and a half days between the announcement of the president’s route and the assassination itself?

As Bob investigates, another voice enters the narrative: knowing, ironic, almost familiar, that of a gifted, Yale-educated veteran of the CIA Plans Division. Hugh Meachum has secrets and the means and the will to keep them buried. When weighed against his own legacy, Swagger’s life is an insignificant expense—but to blunt the threat, he’ll first have to ambush the sniper.

As each man hunts the other across today’s globe and through the thickets of history, The Third Bullet builds to an explosive climax that will finally prove what Bob Lee Swagger has always known: it’s never too late for justice.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - sharoncville3579 - LibraryThing

Well-written and thought-provoking. Not my normal cup of tea, but Hunter is an interesting writer who backs his story up with a believable interpretation of the known facts. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - labdaddy4 - LibraryThing

It is not often I simply give up on a book - this was one of the rare occurrences. The lead character - Bob Lee Swagger - did absolutely nothing for me. I understand he is a recurring primary ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
9
Section 3
26
Section 4
46
Section 5
65
Section 6
78
Section 7
86
Section 8
95
Section 23
307
Section 24
314
Section 25
326
Section 26
339
Section 27
347
Section 28
351
Section 29
359
Section 30
368

Section 9
128
Section 10
139
Section 11
159
Section 12
169
Section 13
193
Section 14
208
Section 15
222
Section 16
227
Section 17
244
Section 18
251
Section 19
260
Section 20
275
Section 21
279
Section 22
288
Section 31
373
Section 32
392
Section 33
397
Section 34
402
Section 35
412
Section 36
418
Section 37
425
Section 38
428
Section 39
441
Section 40
451
Section 41
455
Section 42
457
Section 43
463
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

Stephen Hunter has written eighteen novels. The retired chief film critic for The Washington Post, where he won the 2003 Pulitzer Prize for Distinguished Criticism, he has also published two collections of film criticism and a nonfiction work, American Gunfight. He lives in Baltimore, Maryland.

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