A Woman Named Damaris

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Bethany House, 1991 - Fiction - 223 pages
4 Reviews
One of the bestselling Christian novelists of our time, Janette Oke's books have been described as stories that never go out of style. Her readers have enjoyed and benefited from the spiritual insights and practical faith in God that accompany her homey stories. This book is the moving story of a 15-year-old who, unable to tolerate her drinking father's abuse, joins a wagon train heading West.

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User Review  - SABC - LibraryThing

Damaris escapes from her abusive father with her 2 precious treasures that belonged to her grandparents. She studies why her mother named her Damaris, from the Bible and soon realizes that she must trust another Father Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - LivySue - LibraryThing

A summary of A Woman Named Damaris (Livy Massie 14) In the beginning of this story, a young 15-year-old girl finally finds the courage to run away from her alcoholic, abusive father. She finally ... Read full review

Contents

Damaris
11
A Daring Idea
20
Travel
29
Copyright

21 other sections not shown

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About the author (1991)

Janette Oke (pronounced "oak") was born in Champion, Alberta, Canada, during the depression years. She graduated from Mountain View Bible College in Didsbury, Alberta where she met her husband, Edward. She and Edward married in 1957 and went on to serve churches in Calgary and Edmonton, Canada, and Indiana. Oke published her first book, Love Comes Softly, in 1979. The book experienced immediate success because works of fiction were a virtually unknown genre in the Christian publishing industry. Oke has gone on to publish some 36 romance novels, earning her the 1992 President's Award from the Evangelical Christian Publishers Association. She is the author of the "Love Comes Softly" and the "Prairie Legacy" series of books. Oke enjoys a large reading audience primarily comprised of teenagers, homemakers and working women. She recently started writing for young children.

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