Design of Linear RF Outphasing Power Amplifiers

Front Cover
This is the first book devoted exclusively to the outphasing power amplifier, covering the most recent research results on important aspects in practical design and applications. A compilation of all the proposed outphasing approaches, this is an important resource for engineers designing base station and mobile handset amplifiers, engineering managers and program managers supervising power amplifier designs, and R&D personnel in industry. The work enables you to: design microwave power amplifiers with higher efficiency and improved linearity at a lower cost; understand linearity and performance tradeoffs in microwave power amplifiers; and understand the effect of new modulation techniques on microwave power amplifiers.
 

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Contents

1 Introduction 1
1
2 Linearity Performance of Outphasing Power Amplifier Systems 35
35
3 Path Mismatch Reduction Techniques for Outphasing Amplifiers 87
87
4 PowerCombining and EfficiencyEnhancement Techniques 129
129
About the Authors 191
191
Index 193
193
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Xuejun Zhang holds a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of California, San Diego, an M.S. in electro-optics from the National University of Singapore, and a B.S. in semiconductor physics from Peking University, China. He is senior engineer at Qualcomm Inc. He has published extensively.

Lawrence E. Larson holds an M.B.A. and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of California, Los Angeles, an M. Eng. and B.S. in electrical engineering from Cornell University, New York. Larson is director of the Center for Wireless Communications at the University of California, San Diego and past CWC Industry Chair Professor in Wireless Communications, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. A Fellow of the IEEE, he has conducted numerous research and development projects at Hughes Research Laboratories and Hughes Network Systems.

Peter M. Asbeck holds a Ph.D., M.S. and B.S. in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is a professor of Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of California, San Diego and has done extensive work at Philips Laboratories and the Rockwell International Science Center as principal scientist, technical staff member, researcher and teacher. He is a Fellow of the IEEE.

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