Apricot Jam, and Other Stories

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Counterpoint Press, 2011 - Fiction - 375 pages
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After years of living in exile, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn returned to Russia in 1994 and published a series of eight powerfully paired stories. These groundbreaking stories-- interconnected and juxtaposed using an experimental method Solzhenitsyn referred to as "binary”--join Solzhenitsyn’s already available work as some of the most powerful literature of the twentieth century.

With Soviet and post-Soviet life as their focus, they weave and shift inside their shared setting, illuminating the Russian experience under the Soviet regime. In "The Upcoming Generation,” a professor promotes a dull but proletarian student purely out of good will. Years later, the same professor finds himself arrested and, in a striking twist of fate, his student becomes his interrogator. In "Nastenka,” two young women with the same name lead routine, ordered lives--until the Revolution exacts radical change on them both.

The most eloquent and acclaimed opponent of government oppression, Solzhenitsyn was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1970, and his work continues to receive international acclaim. Available for the first time in English, Apricot Jam: And Other Stories is a striking example of Solzhenitsyn’s singular style and only further solidifies his place as a true literary giant.
 

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User Review  - Clara53 - LibraryThing

Compelling topic (cannot expect less of Solzhenitzyn), but disappointing writing, which I am very much tempted to blame on less than adequate translation. Read full review

Contents

APRICOT JAM
1
EgO
21
THE NEw gENERATION
59
NASTENKA
75
ADLIg SCHwENKITTEN
113
ZHELYABugA VILLAgE
171
TIMES Of CRISIS
231
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About the author (2011)

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn was born on December 11, 1918 in Kislovodsk in the northern Caucusus Mountains. He received a degree in physics and math from Rostov University in 1941. He served in the Russian army during World War II but was arrested in 1945 for writing a letter criticizing Stalin. He spent the next decade in prisons and labor camps and, later, exile, before being allowed to return to central Russia, where he worked as a high school science teacher. His first novel, One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich, was published in 1962. In 1970, he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature. In 1974, he was arrested for treason and exiled following the publication of The Gulag Archipelago. He moved to Switzerland and later the U. S. where he continued to write fiction and history. When the Soviet Union collapsed, he returned to his homeland. His other works include The First Circle and The Cancer Ward. He died due to a heart ailment on August 3, 2008 at the age of 89.

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