Turfgrasses: Their Management and Use in the Southern Zone, Second Edition

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Texas A&M University Press, 2001 - Nature - 323 pages
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This extensively revised edition of Richard L. Duble's reference volume contains all the information needed to create and maintain beautiful lawngrass for homes, golf courses, athletic fields, and parks in mild climates.

Based on the author's thirty years of research, Turfgrasses presents a thorough discussion of more than one hundred varieties and twelve species of warm-season turfgrasses.

Chapters explain the basic biology of turfgrass growth from seed to maturity and review each type of turfgrass, giving its origin, area of adaptation, use, management, and unique characteristics. Creating a new turf is explained, from site selection and seedbed preparation to maintenance practices. Special turfgrass improvement methods are presented for both shaded and overseeded sites. Other chapter topics include common diseases, plus a helpful key to their identification; management practices for turfgrass insects, such as white grubs, chinch bugs, sod webworms, and armyworms; and turfgrass maintenance programs for golf greens and athletic fields.

Profuse color illustrations and tables focus on water budgeting, turfgrass selection criteria, and mowing height and frequency to seeding rates, fertilizer calculations, and chemical controls.

 

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Contents

Contributions of Turf grasses
3
The Turf grass Plant
10
Growth and Development of Turfgrasses
16
Southern Turfgrasses
38
Specifications for Turf grass Establishment
100
Cultural Practices
131
Special Cultural Practices
189
Weed Control in Turf
211
Turf grass Diseases
241
Managing Turf grass Insects
261
Turfgrass Maintenance Programs
277
References
313
Index
319
Copyright

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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 16 - Self-pollination is the transfer of pollen from the anther. to the stigma of the same flower or to the stigma of another flower of the same plant.
Page 4 - The sight of a turf, whether of shortgrass carpeting the earth or tall grass waving in the wind, restores my soul. A valley of green grass is beautiful in the way that mountains, seas, and stars are beautiful

About the author (2001)

Richard L. Duble is a professor and extension turfgrass specialist at Texas A&M University. He is the editor of Texas Turfgrass and Southern Turfgrass magazines and the author of Southern Lawns and Ground Covers and numerous magazine and journal articles.

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