The Lemon Tree: An Arab, a Jew, and the Heart of the Middle East

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Bloomsbury Publishing USA, 2007 - Biography & Autobiography - 362 pages
18 Reviews
In 1967, Bashir Khairi, a twenty-five-year-old Palestinian, journeyed to Israel with the goal of seeing the beloved stone house with the lemon tree behind it that he and his family had fled nineteen years earlier. To his surprise, when he found the house he was greeted by Dalia Eshkenazi Landau, a nineteen-year-old Israeli college student, whose family left fled Europe for Israel following the Holocaust. On the stoop of their shared home, Dalia and Bashir began a rare friendship, forged in the aftermath of war and tested over the next half century in ways that neither could imagine on that summer day in 1967. Sandy Tolan brings the Israeli-Palestinian conflict down to its most human level, demonstrating that even amid the bleakest political realities there exist stories of hope and transformation.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - LynnB - LibraryThing

An interesting read about a Bulgarian Jewish woman whose family emigrated to Israel in the 1940s and a Palestian man, about her own age, whose house her family lives in. Bashir and his family fled ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Zumbanista - LibraryThing

The Lemon Tree The idea of telling the story of the creation of the State of Israel via the 2 families who lived in the same house is commendable. In practical terms though, there is so much history ... Read full review

Contents

Bell
1
House
8
Rescue
24
Expulsion
44
Emigration
70
Refuge
86
Arrival
104
War
123
Explosion
164
Deportation
192
Hope
223
Homeland
248
The Lemon Tree
263
Source Notes
289
Index
355
Copyright

Encounter
144

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About the author (2007)

Sandy Tolan is the author of Me & Hank and Children of the Stone. As cofounder of Homelands Productions, Tolan has produced dozens of radio documentaries for NPR and PRI. He has also written for more than forty magazines and newspapers. His work has won numerous awards, and he was a 1993 Nieman Fellow at Harvard University and an I. F. Stone Fellow at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism. He is an associate professor at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles.

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