The Birth of the West: Rome, Germany, France, and the Creation of Europe in the Tenth Century

Front Cover
PublicAffairs, Feb 12, 2013 - History - 484 pages
2 Reviews

The tenth century dawned in violence and disorder. Charlemagne's empire was in ruins, most of Spain had been claimed by Moorish invaders, and even the papacy in Rome was embroiled in petty, provincial conflicts. To many historians, it was a prime example of the ignorance and uncertainty of the Dark Ages. Yet according to historian Paul Collins, the story of the tenth century is the story of our culture's birth, of the emergence of our civilization into the light of day.

The Birth of the West tells the story of a transformation from chaos to order, exploring the alien landscape of Europe in transition. It is a fascinating
narrative that thoroughly renovates older conceptions of feudalism and what medieval life was actually like. The result is a wholly new vision of how civilization sprang from the unlikeliest of origins, and proof that our tenth-century ancestors are not as remote as we might think.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - VGAHarris - LibraryThing

Some interesting stories about the papal and political rivalries in Europe but the writing leaves a great deal to be desired. Basically a collection of facts, names, and dates that never connect to an ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Schmerguls - LibraryThing

This book is pretty heavy going at times as it slogs through the chaotic world of the years around the tenth century, but it ends strong and does a good job showing why the tenth century can be said ... Read full review

Contents

From the Fury of the Northmen Lord Deliver Us
1
PART
9
the Fall ofMarozia
33
The Nadir of the Papacy
69
PART
89
Ireland Scotland and Wales
227
PART THREE
244
Her MotherinLaw
269
PART FOUR
291
PART FIVE
361
Acknowledgments
429
Primary Sources
455
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2013)

Paul Collins graduated from Harvard with a master of theology, received his doctorate in philosophy in history from the Australian National University, and was ordained a Catholic priest. Since March 2001, when he resigned from active priestly ministry after thirty-three years of service due to a doctrinal dispute with the Vatican, he has been a full-time writer and radio and TV presenter. He lives in Australia.

Bibliographic information