Electroanalysis at the Nanoscale: Durham University, United Kingdom, 1-3 July 2013

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Royal Society of Chemistry, Oct 31, 2013 - Science - 448 pages
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The classical field of electroanalysis is emerging as a new and exciting tool in the 21st century. The characterisation, detection and theoretical behaviour of ions and electrons at the nanoscale is a growth area, of immense interest in the diverse fields of science and technology ranging from biological applications, fuel cells, surface and materials characterisation to sensing. Electrochemistry at the nanoscale is closely linked to interfacial chemistry at the solid-liquid, liquid-liquid phases, material sciences and condensed matter physics. The paradigm shift in electrochemistry started in the 1980s with development of new trends such as structured micro and nano-electrodes allowing atomic scale and dynamic investigations. Enabling in-situ techniques such as Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy combined with AFM, spectro-electrochemical methods together with advanced theoretical calculations using DFT and Monte Carlo simulations have revolutionised the field. Mention should also be made of nano-materials e.g. based on CNTs, graphene, TiO2 and other metal oxides. The aim of this book is to bring together advances in the field of electroanaysis with particular emphasis on the role nanoscale has to play.

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Faraday Discussions documents a long-established series of Faraday Discussion meetings which provide a unique international forum for the exchange of views and newly acquired results in developing areas of physical chemistry, biophysical chemistry and chemical physics. The papers presented are published in the Faraday Discussion volume together with a record of the discussion contributions made at the meeting. Faraday Discussions therefore provide an important record of current international knowledge and views in the field concerned. The latest (2012) impact factor of Faraday Discussions is 3.82.

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