We Need to Talk about Kevin

Front Cover
Serpent's Tail, 2005 - Epistolary fiction - 468 pages
187 Reviews
WINNER OF THE ORANGE PRIZE FOR FICTION 2005 Two years ago, Eva Khatchadourian?s son, Kevin, murdered seven of his fellow high-school students, a cafeteria worker, and a popular algebra teacher. Because he was only fifteen at the time of the killings, he received a lenient sentence and is now in a prison for young offenders in upstate New York. Telling the story of Kevin's upbringing, Eva addresses herself to her estranged husband through a series of letters. Fearing that her own shortcomings may have shaped what her son has become, she confesses to a deep, long-standing ambivalence about both motherhood in general and Kevin in particular. How much is her fault? Lionel Shriver tells a compelling, absorbing, and resonant story while framing these horrifying tableaux of teenage carnage as metaphors for the larger tragedy - the tragedy of a country where everything works, nobody starves, and anything can be bought but a sense of purpose.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - trayceetee - LibraryThing

I. LOVED. This book! I loved the way it was written, both the format and the actual wording. Lionel Shriver is a GENIUS with words!!! Y'know how, sometimes, you have a conversation with someone, or ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - gypsysmom - LibraryThing

This is a book that is going to haunt me for years I think. Eva Katchadourian is the mother of Kevin Katchadourian who at the age of almost 16 (that is significant) cold bloodedly killed 7 students ... Read full review

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About the author (2005)

Lionel Shriver's seventh novel, We Need to Talk About Kevin, won the 2005 Orange Prize. Her other novels are: A Perfectly Good Family, Game Control, Ordinary Decent Criminals, Checker and the Derailleurs and The Female of the Species. She has also written for the Guardian, Financial Times, Wall Street Journal, and the Economist. She lives in London.

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