Selected Poems

Front Cover
Library of America, 2004 - Poetry - 156 pages
0 Reviews
A cigar-smoking proponent of free-verse modernism in open rebellion against her distinguished Boston lineage, Amy Lowell cut an indelible public figure in her lifetime. But in the words of editor Honor Moore, what strikes the contemporary reader is not the sophistication of Lowell's feminist or antiwar stances, but the bald audacity of her eroticism. Her search for an imagist poetry that is hard and clear, never blurred nor indefinite, found its purest expression in sensual love poems that bristle with lyric intensity. This new selection explores Lowell's full formal range, including cadenced verse, polyphonic prose, narrative poetry, and adaptations from the Chinese, and gives a fresh sense of the passion and energy of her work.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

from Sword Blades and Poppy Seed 1914
9
Posthumously Published Poems
121
Biographical Note
143
Copyright

1 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2004)

Amy Lawrence Lowell (February 9, 1874 - May 12, 1925) was an American poet of the imagist school from Brookline, Massachusetts, who posthumously won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1926. Although Amy Lowell did not look like the stereotypical poet---she was of ample build and enjoyed smoking large black cigars in public---she did write verse that was revolutionary in its time. When "Sword Blades" and "Poppy Seed" (1914) were published, she emerged as the leader of the new poetry movement called the imagist school, and so thoroughly was she identified with this new precise and delicate style that Ezra Pound jokingly proposed to retitle it "Amygism." Two of her poems, "Patterns" (1915) and "A Lady" (1914) are frequently anthologized, both demonstrating her vivid depiction of color, agility with sharp images, and precise use of words. Lowell came from a well-known and established Boston family that included James Russell Lowell as one of her predecessors and was later to produce another well-known poet in the person of Robert Lowell. Louis Untermeyer said of Amy Lowell in his introduction to "The Complete Poetical Works" (1955), that "her final place in the history of American literature has not been determined, but the importance of her influence remains unquestioned. Underneath her preoccupation with the need for novelty...she was a dynamic force." Her posthumous volume, "What's O'Clock" (1925), was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for poetry in 1926.

Honor Moore is a poet and the author of The Bishop s Daughter. She lives in New York City and teaches at the New School and Columbia University.

Bibliographic information