My Bondage and My Freedom

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Penguin, Feb 4, 2003 - Biography & Autobiography - 432 pages
3 Reviews
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Ex-slave Frederick Douglass's second autobiography-written after ten years of reflection following his legal emancipation in 1846 and his break with his mentor William Lloyd Garrison-catapulted Douglass into the international spotlight as the foremost spokesman for American blacks, both freed and slave. Written during his celebrated career as a speaker and newspaper editor, My Bondage and My Freedom reveals the author of the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (1845) grown more mature, forceful, analytical, and complex with a deepened commitment to the fight for equal rights and liberties.

Edited with an Introduction and Notes by John David Smith"
 

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User Review  - GRLopez - LibraryThing

This book should be required reading in high school/college. Frederick Douglass is America's hero because he understood and relentlessly pursued and fought for man's basic needs of liberty, justice, humanity, and truth. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - LisaMaria_C - LibraryThing

This is a great book, by a great American. Skeptics looking at that statement might think, well sure you think that reading his own account. Except I've found autobiographies unintentionally revealing ... Read full review

Contents

VII
29
VIII
36
IX
41
X
48
XI
61
XII
68
XIII
81
XIV
90
XXV
198
XXVI
222
XXVII
234
XXVIII
247
XXIX
263
XXX
269
XXXI
289
XXXII
299

XV
97
XVI
105
XVII
112
XVIII
120
XIX
127
XX
136
XXI
150
XXII
163
XXIII
171
XXIV
183
XXXIII
301
XXXIV
317
XXXV
326
XXXVI
333
XXXVII
340
XXXVIII
345
XXXIX
350
XL
356
XLI
365
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About the author (2003)

Frederick Douglass, an outspoken abolitionist, was born into slavery in 1818 and, after his escape in 1838, repeatedly risked his own freedom as an antislavery lecturer, writer, and publisher.

John David Smith is Distinguished Professor of History and Director of the Masters in Public History Program at North Carolina State University.


John David Smith is Distinguished Professor of History and Director of the Masters in Public History Program at North Carolina State University.

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