Urban Utopias in the Twentieth Century: Ebenezer Howard, Frank Lloyd Wright, and Le Corbusier

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MIT Press, 1982 - Architecture - 332 pages
The utopian visions of three of urban planning's greatest visionaries.

Ebenezer Howard, Frank Lloyd Wright and Le Corbusier, hated the cities of their time with an overwhelming passion. The metropolis was the counter-image of their ideal cities, the hell that inspired their heavens. In this book Robert Fishman examines the utopian visions of three of urban planning's greatest visionaries. Howard created the concept of the "garden city" where shops and cottages formed the center of a geometric pattern with farmland surrounding; Wright conceived of "Broadacre City," the ultimate suburb, where the automobile was king; and Le Corbusier imagined "Ville Radieuse," the city of cruciform skyscrapers set down in open parkland.

 

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Contents

The Ideal City Made Practicable
23
Design for Cooperation
40
Building the Garden City
64
Beyond the Grave
82
An American Boyhood
97
Chicago and Oak Park
102
In the Wilderness
115
Broadacre City
122
Architecture or Revolution
182
The Contemporary City
188
Plan Voisin
205
The Ghost of Colbert
213
The Radiant City
226
Quest for Authority
235
VfcJiy
243
Triumph and Disillusionment
253

Community and Culture
135
Prophetic Leadership
142
The Living City
152
Summation
156
Le Corbusier
160
Contrasts
163
SelfCreation
165
Summation
258
CONCLUSION
265
NOTES
279
BIBLIOGRAPHY 3
317
INDEX
325
Copyright

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