Lucifer's Hammer

Front Cover
Fawcett Crest, 1983 - Fiction - 640 pages
41 Reviews
Monumental devastation will sweep across the globe if the newly-discovered Hamner-Brown comet collides with the one major obstacle in its path: Earth.
For millionaire Tim Hamner, the comet is a ticket to immortality. For filmmaker Harvey Randall, it's a shot to redeem a flagging career. And for astronauts John Baker and Rick Delanty, it's a second chance for glory in outer space.
But for a world gripped by comet fever, fascination quickly turns to fear. And only those who survive the impact will know the even greater terror, when rich and poor, politicians and killers, turn to each other or against each other--and the remnants of humanity grow savage to battle for what little remains . . .
Including an all-new introduction by the authors!
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
21
4 stars
15
3 stars
5
2 stars
0
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - CSDaley - LibraryThing

The book feels a little dated now but was still worth the read. One of those books that I have been meaning to read for years. I enjoyed it but there were a few parts that went a little long and a few ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - encephalical - LibraryThing

Imagine riding out the aftermath of a comet strike on Ronald Reagan's Rancho del Cielo where not only one learns how to use every part of a rat carcass but also that all that 70s wishy-washy Alan Alda ... Read full review

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1983)

Larry Niven was born in 1938 in Los Angeles, California. In 1956, he entered the California Institute of Technology, only to flunk out a year and a half later after discovering a bookstore jammed with used science-fiction magazines. He graduated with a B.A. in mathematics (minor in psychology) from Washburn University, Kansas, in 1962, and completed one year of graduate work before he dropped out to write. His first published story, "The Coldest Place," appeared in the December 1964 issue of Worlds of If. He won the Hugo Award for Best Short Story in 1966 for "Neutron Star" and in 1974 for "The Hole Man." The 1975 Hugo Award for Best Novelette was given to The Borderland of Sol. His novel Ringworld won the 1970 Hugo Award for Best Novel, the 1970 Nebula Award for Best Novel, and the 1972 Ditmar, an Australian award for Best International Science Fiction.

Bibliographic information