Lucifer's Hammer

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Fawcett Crest, 1983 - Fiction - 640 pages
41 Reviews
"The first satisfying end-of-the-world novel in years . . . an ultimate one . . . massively entertaining."--Cleveland Plain-Dealer

The gigantic comet had slammed into Earth, forging earthquakes a thousand times too powerful to measure on the Richter scale, tidal waves thousands of feet high. Cities were turned into oceans; oceans turned into steam. It was the beginning of a new Ice Age and the end of civilization.

But for the terrified men and women chance had saved, it was also the dawn of a new struggle for survival--a struggle more dangerous and challenging than any they had ever known. . . .

"Take your earthquakes, waterlogged condominiums, swarms of bugs, colliding airplanes and flaming what-nots, wrap them up and they wouldn't match one page of Lucifer's Hammer for sweaty-palmed suspense."--Chicago Daily News
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - CSDaley - LibraryThing

The book feels a little dated now but was still worth the read. One of those books that I have been meaning to read for years. I enjoyed it but there were a few parts that went a little long and a few ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - encephalical - LibraryThing

Imagine riding out the aftermath of a comet strike on Ronald Reagan's Rancho del Cielo where not only one learns how to use every part of a rat carcass but also that all that 70s wishy-washy Alan Alda ... Read full review

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About the author (1983)

Larry Niven was born in 1938 in Los Angeles, California. In 1956, he entered the California Institute of Technology, only to flunk out a year and a half later after discovering a bookstore jammed with used science-fiction magazines. He graduated with a B.A. in mathematics (minor in psychology) from Washburn University, Kansas, in 1962, and completed one year of graduate work before he dropped out to write. His first published story, "The Coldest Place," appeared in the December 1964 issue of Worlds of If. He won the Hugo Award for Best Short Story in 1966 for "Neutron Star" and in 1974 for "The Hole Man." The 1975 Hugo Award for Best Novelette was given to The Borderland of Sol. His novel Ringworld won the 1970 Hugo Award for Best Novel, the 1970 Nebula Award for Best Novel, and the 1972 Ditmar, an Australian award for Best International Science Fiction.

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