Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass

Front Cover
Penguin, Dec 1, 2000 - Fiction - 240 pages
The two Alice books--Lewis Carroll's masterpieces--are ranked by many as peers of the great adult works of English literature. And despite their riches of "untranslatable" puns, nonsense, and parody, they have been happily translated around the world. The matchless original illustrations by Tenniel share with Carroll's text the glory of making Alice immortal.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
3
4 stars
0
3 stars
0
2 stars
0
1 star
7

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass (Bantam Classics)のElstirさんの感想・レビュー

User Review  - Elstir - 読書メーター

Life, what is it but a dream? Read full review

Everyone should have a copy

User Review  - jklein360 - Overstock.com

I couldnt believe I didnt have a copy of this book. So I had to buy it. Great pictures. Great read. Read full review

All 7 reviews »

Contents

Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Section 4
Section 5
Section 6
Section 7
Section 8
Section 22
Section 23
Section 24
Section 25
Section 26
Section 27
Section 28
Section 29

Section 9
Section 10
Section 11
Section 12
Section 13
Section 14
Section 15
Section 16
Section 17
Section 18
Section 19
Section 20
Section 21
Section 30
Section 31
Section 32
Section 33
Section 34
Section 35
Section 36
Section 37
Section 38
Section 39
Section 40
Section 41
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2000)

Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, known by his pen name, Lewis Carroll, was a man of diverse interests - in mathematics, logic, photgraphy, art, theater, religion, medicine, and science. He was happiest in the company of children for whom he created puzzles, clever games, and charming letters.

As all Carroll admirers know, his book Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865), became an immediate success and has since been translated into more than eighty languages. The equally popular sequel Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There, was published in 1872.

The Alice books are but one example of his wide ranging authorship. The Hunting of the Snark, a classic nonsense epic (1876) and Euclid and His Modern Rivals, a rare example of humorous work concerning mathematics, still entice and intrigue today's students. Sylvie and Bruno, published toward the end of his life contains startling ideas including an 1889 description of weightlessness.

The humor, sparkling wit and genius of this Victorian Englishman have lasted for more than a century. His books are among the most quoted works in the English language, and his influence (with that of his illustrator, Sir John Tenniel) can be seen everywhere, from the world of advertising to that of atomic physics.

Bibliographic information