Democratic Peace: A Political Biography

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University of Michigan Press, Jul 22, 2013 - Political Science - 266 pages
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The Democratic Peace Thesis holds that democracies rarely make war on other democracies. Political scientists have advanced numerous theories attempting to identify precisely which elements of democracy promote this mutual peace, often hoping that Democratic Peace could be the final and ultimate antidote to war. However, as the theories were taken up by political figures, the immediate outcomes were war and the perpetuation of hostilities.



Political theorist Piki Ish-Shalom sketches the origins and early academic development of the Democratic Peace Thesis. He then focuses on the ways in which various Democratic Peace Theories were used by Bill Clinton and George W. Bush both to shape and to justify U.S. foreign policy, particularly the U.S. stance on the Israeli-Palestinian situation and the War in Iraq. In the conclusion, Ish-Shalom boldly confronts the question of how much responsibility theoreticians must bear for the political uses—and misuses—of their ideas.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
A Theoretical Model
14
2 Democratic Peace as Theoretical Constructions
39
3 Democratic Peace as a Public Convention
68
The Israeli Rights Mobilization of the Rhetorical Capital of Democratic Peace
85
The Neoconservative Reading of Democratic Peace
112
6 The Three Free World Theories
142
7 Theorizing and Responsibility
171
Zooming In Zooming Out
204
Notes
219
References
231
Index
259
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About the author (2013)

Piki Ish-Shalom is Associate Professor in the Department of International Relations at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

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