Space-Perception and the Philosophy of Science

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University of California Press, 1988 - Philosophy - 383 pages
Drawing on the phenomenological tradition in the philosophy of science and philosophy of nature, Patrick Heelan concludes that perception is a cognitive, world-building act, and is therefore never absolute or finished.
 

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Contents

Introduction to Visual Space
27
QuasiStable EuclideanNonEuclidean Phenomena
35
Pictorial Spaces
42
NonEuclidean Visual Space
46
Horizon Sphere
59
Spheroidal World of Sight
72
Illusions of Rotation and Optical Images
90
Fishbone Perspective and Curved Space
103
Perception of Scientific Entities
192
Identity Theories and Psychobiology
214
Hermeneutics and the History of Science
220
Euclidean Space as a Scientific Artifact
247
World Possibilities
254
Retrospective
264
Hyperbolic Visual Map of Physical Space
281
Notes
321

TOWARD A PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE BASED
129
Causal Physiological Model of Perception
147
Realism
155
Horizonal Realism
173

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About the author (1988)

Patrick A. Heelan is Professor of Philosophy at the State University of New York at Stony Brook.

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