The Weimar Republic Sourcebook

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Anton Kaes, Martin Jay, Edward Dimendberg
University of California Press, Nov 14, 1995 - History - 806 pages
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A laboratory for competing visions of modernity, the Weimar Republic (1918-1933) continues to haunt the imagination of the twentieth century. Its political and cultural lessons retain uncanny relevance for all who seek to understand the tensions and possibilities of our age. The Weimar Republic Sourcebook represents the most comprehensive documentation of Weimar culture, history, and politics assembled in any language. It invites a wide community of readers to discover the richness and complexity of the turbulent years in Germany before Hitler's rise to power.

Drawing from such primary sources as magazines, newspapers, manifestoes, and official documents (many unknown even to specialists and most never before available in English), this book challenges the traditional boundaries between politics, culture, and social life. Its thirty chapters explore Germany's complex relationship to democracy, ideologies of "reactionary modernism," the rise of the "New Woman," Bauhaus architecture, the impact of mass media, the literary life, the tradition of cabaret and urban entertainment, and the situation of Jews, intellectuals, and workers before and during the emergence of fascism.

While devoting much attention to the Republic's varied artistic and intellectual achievements (the Frankfurt School, political theater, twelve-tone music, cultural criticism, photomontage, and urban planning), the book is unique for its inclusion of many lesser-known materials on popular culture, consumerism, body culture, drugs, criminality, and sexuality; it also contains a timetable of major political events, an extensive bibliography, and capsule biographies. This will be a major resource and reference work for students and scholars in history; art; architecture; literature; social and political thought; and cultural, film, German, and women's studies.
 

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From the end of World War I to the rise of Adolf Hitler, the Weimar Republic remains one of the pivotal social experiments in 20th-century history, embracing all aspects of German cultural, political ... Read full review

Contents

The Legacy of the War
5
Ernst Simmel War Neuroses and Psychic Trauma 1918
7
The Reparations Clauses 1919
8
Count Ulrich von BrockdorffRantzau Speech of the German Delegation Versailles 1919
9
Ernst Troeltsch The Dogma of Guilt 1919
12
Paul von Hindenburg The Stab in the Back 1919
15
Social Democratic Party SPD Appeal for a General Strike 1920
16
Ernst Jünger Fire 1922
18
Matheo Quinz The Romanic Café 1926
415
Kurt Tucholsky Berlin and the Provinces 1928
418
Franz Hessel The Suspicious Character 1929
420
Egon Erwin Kisch We Go to a Café Because 1930
423
Harold Nicolson The Charm of Berlin 1932
425
Why Do We Stay in the Provinces? 1933
426
Modern Architecture and the Bauhaus
429
Bruno Taut A Program for Architecture 1918
432

Kurt Tucholsky The Spirit of 1914 1924
20
Io Carl Zuckmayer Erich Maria Remarques All Quiet on the Western Front 1929
23
Ernst von Salomon The Outlawed 1929
24
Albert Einstein and Sigmund Freud Why War? 1933
25
Revolution and the Birth of the Republic
35
Spartacus Manifesto 1918
37
Heinrich Mann The Meaning and Idea of the Revolution 1918
38
Rosa Luxemburg Founding Manifesto of the Communist Party of Germany KPD 1918
40
The Constitution of the German Republic 1919
46
Count Harry Kessler On Ebert and the Revolution 1919
51
Wilhelm Hausenstein Remembering Eisner 19191920
52
Their History Their Enemies and Their Future 1928
53
Bernhard Prince von Bülow Revolution in Berlin 1931
56
Rationalization Inflation and Depression
60
Das Tagebuch Editorial on the Occupation of the Ruhr 1923
62
Friedrich Kroner Overwrought Nerves 1923
63
The Dawes Committee Report 1924
64
Ernst Neckarsulmer Hugo Stinnes 1925
67
Rudolf Hilferding The Organized Economy 1927
68
Erich Schairer Alfred Hugenberg 1929
72
B Traven Bank Failures 1929
74
Erwin Kupzyk Postwar Concentration in the German Iron Industry 1930
75
Hans Ostwald A Moral History of the Inflation 1931
77
Rolf Wagenführ The Inflation Boom 1932
78
3I Franz von Papen Speech to the Lausanne Conference 1932
80
Heinrich Hauser The Unemployed 1933
84
Coming to Terms with Democracy
86
Friedrich Meinecke The Old and the New Germany 1918
88
Ernst Troeltsch The German Democracy 1918
89
Max Weber Politics as a Vocation 1918
92
Kurt Tucholsky We NaySayers 1919
96
Emil Julius Gumbel Four Years of Political Murder 1922
100
German Center Party Program 1922
104
Thomas Mann The German Republic 1922
105
Das Tagebuch Editorial on the Anniversary of the Death of Walther Rathenau 1923
109
The Great Fashion 1924
110
Social Democratic Party SPD Program 1925
112
German Peoples Party DVP Program 1931
115
Kurt Tucholsky For Carl von Ossietzky 1932
117
The Rise of Nazism
119
Alfred Rosenberg The Russian Jewish Revolution 1919
121
Adolf Bartels The Struggle of the Age 1920
123
German Workers Party DAP The TwentyFive Points 1920
124
Joseph Goebbels National Socialism or Bolshevism? 1925
127
Adolf Hitler Mein Kampf 1927
130
R W Darré Marriage Laws and the Principles of Breeding 1930
133
Joseph Goebbels Why Are We Enemies of the Jews? 1930
137
Adolf Hitler Address to the Industry Club 1932
138
German Farmer You Belong to Hitler Why? 1932
142
Joseph Goebbels Fighting League for German Culture 1932
143
Count Harry Kessler On the Nietzsche Archive and the German Elections 1932
144
The Struggle against Fascism
145
Ernst Bloch Hitlers Force 1924
147
Thomas Mann An Appeal to Reason 1930
150
Walter Benjamin Theories of German Fascism 1930
159
Heinrich Mann The German Decision 1931
164
Lion Feuchtwanger How Do We Struggle against a Third Reich? 1931
167
Joseph Roth Cultural Bolshevism 1932
169
Paul Tillich Ten Theses 1932
171
A Menace 1932
172
PRESSURE POINTS OF SOCIAL LIFE
177
Miffelsfand or Middle Class?
181
Hans Georg Our Stand at the Abyss 1921
182
Margot Starke The Bank Clerk 1923
183
Fritz Schröder The Labor Market for WhiteCollar Workers 1924
184
Wilhelm Kalveram Rationalization in Business Management 1929
185
Hilde Walter The Misery of the New Mittelstand 1929
187
Siegfried Kracauer Shelter for the Homeless 1930
189
Theodor Geiger The Old and New Middle Classes 1932
191
The Rise of the New Woman
195
Marianne Weber The Special Cultural Mission of Women 1919
197
Die Kommunistin Manifesto for International Womens Day 1921
198
Manfred Georg The Right to Abortion 1922
200
A Modern Gretchen Tragedy 1926
202
A Conversation between Men 1928
204
Max Brod Women and the New Objectivity 1929
205
Elsa Herrmann This is the New Woman 1929
206
Textile Workers My Workday My Weekend 1930
208
8O Hilde Walter Twilight for Women? 1931
210
Womens Work and the Economic Crisis 1931
212
Else Kienle The Kienle Case 1931
213
Siegfried Kracauer Working Women 1932
216
Forging a Proletarian Culture
220
A R On Proletarian Culture 1920
222
Otto Rühle The Psyche of the Proletarian Child 1925
223
Larissa Reissner Schiffbek 1925
224
Willi Münzenberg Conquer Film 1925
228
Walter Benjamin Program for a Proletarian Childrens
232
Otto Biha The Proletarian Mass Novel 1930
239
Günther D Dehm Berlin Workers District n d
245
Efraim Frisch Jewish Sketches 19211922
253
IO3 Franz Rosenzweig The New Thinking 1925
259
Ioé Theodor Lessing Jewish SelfHatred 1930
268
Carl von Ossietzky AntiSemites 1932
276
Redefining the Role of the Intellectuals
285
I5 Karl Mannheim Ideology and Utopia 1929
297
Ernst von Salomon We and the Intellectuals 1930
302
Critical Theory and the Search for a New Left
309
I22 Max Horkheimer The Impotence of the German Working
316
I24 Wilhelm Reich Politicizing the Sexual Problems of Youth 1932
322
Social Democratic Party SPD The Iron Front for a United
329
I30 Ernst Niekisch Where We Stand 1926
338
I34 Arnolt Bronnen German Nationalism German Theater 1931
345
I37 Edgar J Jung Germany and the Conservative Revolution 1932
352
I39 Count Hermann Keyserling The Culture of Making It Easy
360
I42 Martin Heidegger Being and Time 1927
368
Domination and Form 1932
375
Gottfried Benn After Nihilism 1932
380
Ludwig Bauer The Middle Ages 1932 1932
384
Alfred Döblin May the Individual Not Be Stunted by the Masses 1932
386
Fordism and Technology
393
Rudolf Kayser Americanism 1925
395
Stefan Zweig The Monotonization of the World 1925
397
Friedrich von GottlOttlilienfeld Fordism 1926
400
Friedrich Sieburg Worshipping Elevators 1926
402
Siegfried Kracauer The Mass Ornament 1927
404
Adolf Halfeld America and the New Objectivity 1928
407
Felix Stössinger The Anglicization of Germany 1929
408
Otto Bauer Rationalization and the Social Order 1931
410
Berlin and the Countryside
412
Ludwig Finckh The Spirit of Berlin 1919
414
Walter Gropius Program of the Staatliches Bauhaus in Weimar 1919
435
Ludwig Mies van der Rohe Architecture and the Will of the Age 1924
438
Walter Gropius and Paul SchultzeNaumburg Who is Right? Traditional Architecture or Building in New Forms 1926
439
Hannes Meyer The New World 1926
445
Adolf Behne and Paul Westheim The Aesthetics of the Flat Roof 19261927
449
Rudolf Arnheim The Bauhaus in Dessau 1927
450
Erich Mendelsohn Why This Architecture? 1928
451
Marcel Breuer Metal Furniture and Modern Spatiality 1928
453
Housing for the Masses
454
Bruno Taut The Earth is a Good Dwelling 1919
456
Martin Wagner Path and Goal 1920
460
The Woman as Creator 1924
461
Grete Lihotzky Rationalization in the Household 19261927
462
Dr N A Contemporary Garden City 1927
465
Edgar Wedepohl The Weissenhof Settlement 1927
466
MarieElisabeth Lüders A Construction Not a Dwelling 1927
468
The Stuttgart Werkbund Houses 1929
469
Otto Steinicke A Visit to a New Apartment 1929
471
Art and Politics
474
November Group Circular 1918
477
Work Council for Art Manifesto 1919
478
Wilhelm Hausenstein Art at this Moment 19191920
479
Raoul Hausmann The German Philistine Gets Upset 1919
482
John Heartfield and George Grosz The Art Scab 1920
483
Richard Huelsenbeck Dada Tours 1920
486
Max Beckmann Creative Credo 1920
487
Adolf Behne On the 1922 Russian Art Exhibition in Berlin 1922
489
Carl Einstein Otto Dix 1923
490
German Painting since Expressionism 1925
491
Franz Roh PostExpressionist Schema 1925
493
Misch Orend Magical Realism 1928
494
Paul SchultzeNaumburg Art and Race 1928
496
George Grosz Among Other Things a Word for German Tradition 1931
499
High and Low
507
Max Brod Franz Kafkas Posthumous Writings 1924
510
Hermann von Wedderkop Thomas Manns Magic Mountain 1925
512
Walter Benjamin Filling Station 1928
513
Alfred Döblin Ulysses by Joyce 1928
514
Gina Kaus The Woman in Modern Literature 1929
515
Erich Kästner Prosaic Digression 1929
517
Kurt Pinthus Masculine Literature 1929
518
I2 Lion Feuchtwanger The Novel of Today
526
2I4 Leopold Jessner To the Directors of the German
533
Lion Feuchtwanger Bertolt Brecht Presented to
540
Max Reinhardt On Actors 1930
546
Alice Gerstel Jazz Band 1922
554
Joseph Goebbels Around the Gedächtniskirche 1928
560
Siegfried Kracauer Girls and Crisis 1931
565
Friedrich Hollaender Cabaret 1932
566
Gebrauchsmusik and Opera
568
On Whitemans Berlin Concerts 1926 57 1
571
Kurt Weill Zeitoper 1928
572
H H Stuckenschmidt Short Operas 1928
574
Kurt Weill Correspondence about The Threepenny Opera 1929
576
Paul Hindemith and Walter Gropius For the Renewal of Opera 1929
578
Hanns Gutman Music for Use 1929
579
Alban Berg On My Wozzeck 1929
583
Arnold Schoenberg My Public 1930
584
Ernst Krenek New Humanity and Old Objectivity 1931
586
Theodor W Adorno Mahagonny 1932
588
Radio and Gramophone
594
Kurt Weill Dance Music 1926
597
Otto Alfred Palitzsch Broadcast Literature 1927
600
Kurt Tucholsky Radio Censorship 1928
603
Theodor W Adorno The Curves of the Needle 1928
605
Frank Warschauer The Future of Opera on the Radio 1929
607
Arno Schirokauer Art and Politics in Radio 1929
609
Arnolt Bronnen Radio Play or Literature? 1929
610
W E The Writer Speaks and Sings on Gramophone Records 1929
612
Gehrke and Rudolf Arnheim The End of the Private Sphere 1930
613
Bertolt Brecht The Radio as an Apparatus of Communication 1932
615
Cinema from Expressionism to Social Realism
617
26o Herbert Jhering An Expressionist Film 1920
620
Curt Rosenberg Fridericus Rex 1923
621
Fritz Lang The Future of the Feature Film in Germany 1926
622
Willy Haas Metropolis 1927
623
Walter Benjamin A Discussion of Russian Filmic Art and Collectivist Art in General 1927
626
Béla Balázs Writers and Film 1929
628
Emil Jannings Romanticizing the Criminal in Film 1929
629
Siegfried Kracauer The Blue Angel 1930
630
Erich Pommer Writers and the Sound Film 1931
632
Siegfried Kracauer The Task of the Film Critic 1932
634
Illustrated Press and Photography
641
Edlef Köppen The Magazine as a Sign of the Times 1925
644
August Sander Remarks on My Exhibition at the Cologne Art Union 1927
645
Kurt Korff The Illustrated Magazine 1927
646
Albert RengerPatzsch Joy before the Object 1928
647
Johannes Molzahn Stop Reading Look 1928
648
Werner Gräff Foreword to Here Comes the New Photographer 1929
649
Willi Warstat Photography in Advertising 1930
650
Raoul Hausmann Photomontage 1931
651
Alfred Keményi Photomontage as a Weapon in Class Struggle 1932
653
Mass Consumption Fashion and Advertising
655
Boycott of French Fashion Goods 1923
658
Enough is Enough Against the Masculinization of Woman 1925
659
Hanns Kropff Women as Shoppers 1926
660
Ernst Lorsy The Hour of Chewing Gum 1926
662
Hans Siemsen The Literature of Nonreaders 1926
663
Vicki Baum People of Today 1927
664
AutoMagazin Editorial Statement 1928
667
Wolf Zucker Art and Advertising 1929
668
Franz Hessel On Fashion 1929
670
Stephanie Kaul Whose Fault Is the Long Dress? 1931
671
Liselotte de Booy Miss Germany 1932 Wasted Evenings 1932
672
Lebensreform Sports and Dance
673
Adolf Koch The Truth about the Berlin Nudist Groups 1924
676
Felix Hollaender Ways to Strength and Beauty 1924
677
Hans Surén Man and Sunlight 1925
678
Artur Michel Flying Man 1926
679
3O3 Carl Diem The German Academy for Gymnastics 1932
691
Guidelines of the German Association for the Protection
697
League for Human Rights Appeal to All Homosexual
704
I2 Grete Ujhely A Call for Sexual Tolerance 1930 71
710
Vice Crime and the Social Order
718
IQ Ernst Engelbrecht and Leo Heller Opium Dens 1926
726
Artur Landsberger The Berlin Underworld 1929
732
Memories of Inmate No 2911 1931
737
Political Chronology
765
Acknowledgments
789
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Anton Kaes is Professor of German and Director of Film Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. He is author most recently of From Hitler to Heimat: The Return of History as Film (1989). Martin Jay is Sidney Hellman Ehrman Professor of History at the University of California, Berkeley. His books include Downcast Eyes: The Denigration of Vision in Twentieth-Century French Thought (California, 1993). Edward Dimendberg is Assistant Professor of German Studies, Film and Video Studies, and Architecture at
the University of Michigan.

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