Mistrusting Refugees

Front Cover
E. Valentine Daniel, John Chr. Knudsen
University of California Press, 1995 - Political Science - 286 pages
The twentieth century has seen people displaced on an unprecedented scale and has brought concerns about refugees into sharp focus. There are forty million refugees in the world—1 in 130 inhabitants of this planet. In this first interdisciplinary study of the issue, fifteen scholars from diverse fields focus on the worldwide disruption of "trust" as a sentiment, a concept, and an experience.

Contributors provide a rich array of essays that maintain a delicate balance between providing specific details of the refugee experience and exploring corresponding theories of trust and mistrust. Their subjects range widely across the globe, and include Palestinians, Cambodians, Tamils, and Mayan Indians of Guatemala. By examining what individuals experience when removed from their own culture, these essays reflect on individual identity and culture as a whole.
 

Contents

Fostering Trust in a Climate of Fear
8
Negotiating Refugee Narratives
13
Torture Refuge and Trust
56
Refugee Stories of Post1922 Greece
73
Narrating the Palestinian Refugees
87
The Problem of Becoming German and Finding Home
102
How What and for Whom Does One Write about Refugees?
126
Beatriz Manz
151
Dispossession and Empowerment among Palestinian Refugees
168
Politics of Mistrust
187
The Social World of the Refugee Camp
207
Forms Formations and Transformations of the Tamil Refugee
225
From Resettlement to Containment
257
CONTRIBUTORS
279
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