The Rice Sprout Song

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University of California Press, May 15, 1998 - Fiction - 182 pages
The first of Eileen Chang's novels to be written in English, The Rice-Sprout Song portrays the horror and absurdity that the land-reform movement brings to a southern village in China during the early 1950s. Contrary to the hopes of the peasants in this story, the redistribution of land does not mean an end to hunger. Man-made and natural disasters bring about the threat of famine, while China's involvement in the Korean War further deepens the peasants' misery. Chang's chilling depiction of the peasants' desperate attempts to survive both the impending famine and government abuse makes for spellbinding reading. Her critique of communism rewrites the land-reform discourse at the same time it lays bare the volatile relations between politics and literature.
 

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The rice sprout song: a novel of modern China

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Published in 1955 and 1967, respectively, Rice offers a glimpse of rural life in China during the early years of the People's Republic, while Rouge follows the life of a woman locked in a dismal ... Read full review

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Contents

Section 1
11
Section 2
26
Section 3
42
Section 4
57
Section 5
83
Section 6
105
Section 7
109
Section 8
124
Section 9
141
Section 10
148
Section 11
162
Section 12
171
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About the author (1998)

David Der-wei Wang is Professor of Chinese Literature at Columbia University. His current publications include Running Wild: Contemporary Chinese Fiction (1994).

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