Terroir: The Role of Geology, Climate and Culture in the Making of French Wines

Front Cover
University of California Press, Jan 1, 1998 - Cooking - 336 pages
Why do the fine wines of France grow where they do? How can two seemingly similar sites, even within a single vineyard, produce wines of different quality? How much credit goes to the winemakers and how much belongs to nature itself? Who better to ponder these questions than a geologist and wine-lover in equal measure? James E. Wilson is a firm believer that "terroir" - the interplay of natural elements that make up the myriad environments in which vines grow - is the key to understanding why fine wines are produced where they are. This in-depth study, the result of years of meticulous research, reveals the relationship between rocks and grapes. Here is natural history and social history, little-known fact and anecdote, woven into the tale of how geology influences the quality of wine.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Contents
4
Appendices
55
granite slopes marly hills
82
parade of caprock scarps
108
a basin filled with rivers geology and history
164
gravel mounds limestone plateaux
185
river terraces sheets of molasse
214
converging rivers chalk hills ancient rocks
227
a band of chalky scarps
244
a rift shadowed In volcanic peaks
265
battered rocks relentless sun
313
Bibliography
327
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1998)

James E. Wilson is a former Vice President for Exploration and Production at Shell Oil. In his second career he has devoted himself to the study of the natural history and underlying geology of French wines. He lives in Colorado. Hugh Johnson writes the annual best-seller, Pocket Wine Book and is also author of World Atlas of Wine, now in its fourth edition.

Bibliographic information