Decline of the Californios: A Social History of the Spanish-Speaking Californians, 1846-1890

Front Cover
University of California Press, 1998 - History - 324 pages
In his enduring study of Spanish-speaking Californians—a group that includes both native-born Californians, or Californios, and immigrants from Mexico—Leonard Pitt charts one of the earliest chapters in the state's ethnic history, and, in the process, he sheds light on debates and tensions that continue to this day. In a new foreword for this edition, Ramón A. Gutiérrez discusses the shaping and reception of the book and also views this classic work in light of recent scholarship on California and ethnic history.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Mexican California 18261845 i
1
War and Annexation 18461848
26
Califomians and Sonorans under Attack
48
The Head Pickled in Whiskey
69
The Northern Ranchos Decimated
83
The Cow County Ranchos in Limbo
104
SemiGringo Los Angeles
120
Serapes and Split Breeches in Politics
130
Sentiments of Treason
181
California Lost 18551859
195
Catholicism in a Medium State
214
UpheavalsPolitical and Natural 18601864
229
The Second Generation 18651890
249
Schizoid Heritage
277
Bibliography
297
Glossary of Ethnic Terms
309

Race War in Los Angeles 18501856 148
147
Cow County Bandidos 18561859
167

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1998)

Leonard Pitt is Professor Emeritus of History at California State University, Northridge. He is the coauthor, with Dale Pitt, of Los Angeles A to Z: An Encyclopedia (1997). Ramón A. Gutiérrez is Associate Chancellor and Professor of Ethnic Studies and History at the University of California, San Diego, and is coeditor of Contested Eden: California before the Gold Rush (California, 1998).

Bibliographic information