Hegel's Ethics of Recognition

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University of California Press, Oct 2, 2000 - Philosophy - 433 pages
In this significant contribution to Hegel scholarship, Robert Williams develops the most comprehensive account to date of Hegel's concept of recognition (Anerkennung). Fichte introduced the concept of recognition as a presupposition of both Rousseau's social contract and Kant's ethics. Williams shows that Hegel appropriated the concept of recognition as the general pattern of his concept of ethical life, breaking with natural law theory yet incorporating the Aristotelian view that rights and virtues are possible only within a certain kind of community.

He explores Hegel's intersubjective concept of spirit (Geist) as the product of affirmative mutual recognition and his conception of recognition as the right to have rights. Examining Hegel's Jena manuscripts, his Philosophy of Right, the Phenomenology of Spirit, and other works, Williams shows how the concept of recognition shapes and illumines Hegel's understandings of crime and punishment, morality, the family, the state, sovereignty, international relations, and war. A concluding chapter on the reception and reworking of the concept of recognition by contemporary thinkers including Derrida, Levinas, and Deleuze demonstrates Hegel's continuing centrality to the philosophical concerns of our age.
 

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Contents

Recognition and Ethics
1
Recognition in Fichte and Schelling
31
Part
46
The Double Significations in the Concept of Recognition
52
Mastery and Slavery as a Determinate Shape
59
Recognition in the Encyclopedia Philosophy
69
Crossing the Threshold of Ethical Life
77
Universal SelfConsciousness as Affirmative SelfRecognition
88
Wrong Semblance and the Logic of Essence
156
Banquos Ghost
162
of the State
262
Sovereignty international Relations and War
334
War
342
issues of Recognition in International Relations
348
The Deficiency of the International We
357
Recent Views of Recognition and the Question
364

Recognition in the 1805 Jena Philosophy of Spirit
96
BeingRecognized Right and Wrong
103
Systematic issues in the Philosophy of Right if
111
Hegels Method of Abstraction
119
From InItself to ForItself The Development
130
The Intersubjectivity of Ownership
140
The Intersubjectivity of Contract
148
Sartre and Hegel
371
Feminist Critique of Hegel
380
Hegel Nietzsche and Deleuze
389
Derrida and the Ethics of Deconstruction
398
Reciprocity and Totality in Question
408
Index
429
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About the author (2000)

Robert R. Williams, Professor of Philosophy at Hiram College and Vice-President of the Hegel Society of America, is author of Recognition: Hegel and Fichte on the Other (1992).

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