Managing Water: Avoiding Crisis in California

Front Cover
University of California Press, Oct 9, 2007 - Nature - 324 pages
"Dorothy Green has produced a tour de force with her wonderfully clear exposition of the evolution of water-management successes and failures in the greater Los Angeles area and much of the state."—Norris Hundley, author of The Great Thirst: Californians and Water—A History

"If you have questions about water management in California, this book holds the answers. Water delivery systems make life possible in California, from natural watersheds and rivers to man-made aqueducts, treatment plants and delivery pipes. Dorothy Green's Managing Water uses the Los Angeles area to tell a statewide story of water supply, drinking water quality and treatment, conservation, recycling, and future planning. How is water kept pure or, when polluted, made clean again? What contaminates lurk in groundwater basins? What agency delivers water to your home? And how are water policy decisions made that effect your future? This is a detailed summary of the complex world of California water management that provides common sense recommendations for the future."—David Carle, author of Introduction to Water in California

"For students of California water, Dorothy Green uses the complexity of water management in the Los Angeles area as the essential classroom. This is required reading and a necessary reference for all who participate in southern California's efforts to manage its most limited and threatened resource."—Jeffrey Mount, University of California, Davis, author of California Rivers and Streams
 

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Contents

Water Use Efficiency
113
Drinking Water Quality
170
State Policy and the Los Angeles Area
218
Glossary
273
Native Plant Resources
285
Suggested Readings
291
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About the author (2007)

Dorothy Green is founding president of Heal the Bay and among the founders of the Los Angeles & San Gabriel Rivers Watershed Council, of which she is also president emeritus. She has chaired the California Water Policy (POWER) conference for the past 17 years and has helped to found the only non-profit in the state, the California Water Impact Network (c-win.org), totally devoted to water supply issues.

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