Earth Sound Earth Signal: Energies and Earth Magnitude in the Arts

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Univ of California Press, Aug 30, 2013 - Art - 330 pages
Earth Sound Earth Signal is a study of energies in aesthetics and the arts, from the birth of modern communications in the nineteenth century to the global transmissions of the present day. Douglas Kahn begins by evoking the Aeolian sphere music that Henry David Thoreau heard blowing along telegraph lines and the Aelectrosonic sounds of natural radio that Thomas Watson heard through the first telephone; he then traces the histories of science, media, music, and the arts to the 1960s and beyond. Earth Sound Earth Signal rethinks energy at a global scale, from brainwaves to outer space, through detailed discussions of musicians, artists and scientists such as Alvin Lucier, Edmond Dewan, Pauline Oliveros, John Cage, James Turrell, Robert Barry, Joyce Hinterding, and many others.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Natural Radio Natural Theology
25
Microphonic Imagination
34
The Aeolian and Henry David Thoreaus Sphere Music
41
The Aelectrosonic and Energetic Environments
53
Inductive Radio and Whistling Currents
69
Brainwaves
83
Edmond Dewan and Cybernetic HiFi
93
Earthquakes Nuclear Weaponry and Music
133
Long Sounds and Transperception
162
Sonosphere
174
Electroreceptor
187
Black Sun Black Rain
193
StarStudded Cinema
205
Conceptualism and Energy
218
Drawing Energy
237

Whistlers
106
John Cage and Karl Jansky
115
For More New Signals
122
EarthinCircuit
255
Index
317
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

Douglas Kahn is Professor of Media and Innovation at the National Institute for Experimental Arts at the University of New South Wales, Australia. He is author or editor of several books, including Noise Water Meat: A History of Sound in the Arts (1999) and, most recently, Source: Music of the Avant-Garde (2011) and Mainframe Experimentalism (2012).

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