Our Bodies Belong to God: Organ Transplants, Islam, and the Struggle for Human Dignity in Egypt

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University of California Press, Mar 13, 2012 - Medical - 342 pages
"Based on extensive research in Egypt, this powerful, deeply disturbing ethnography causes readers to question commonly held assumptions about the organ transplant enterprise. Hamdy, acutely sensitive to the destructive forces of extreme poverty, argues against an ethics of codified rules whether religious or secular, and for a flexible bioethics situated in the historical, socio/economic and religious realities of Egyptians' daily life."--Margaret Lock, co-author of An Anthropology of Biomedicine

“This is the best ethnography yet available on Islamic ethical reasoning and medical practice. Hamdy presents a truly sophisticated and nuanced portrayal of the organ transplant debate in Egypt and its larger implications for the Middle East and medicine.” --John Bowen, author of A New Anthropology of Islam

Our Bodies Belong to God is a sensitive and original exploration of how religious ethics inform the practice of medicine for doctors, patients and policy makers alike. This will be read widely in medical anthropology and the field of ethics.” --Saba Mahmood, author of Politics of Piety: The Islamic Revival and the Feminist Subject







 

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Contents

bioethics rebound
1
egypts crises of authority
21
when the experts disagree
47
corneas dead donors
83
genealogy
115
the ethics
141
ethics and risk
173
principles we cant afford? ethics
209
Notes
257
Glossary of Frequently Used Arabic Terms
297
Index
319
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About the author (2012)

Sherine Hamdy is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Brown University.

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