Weill's Musical Theater: Stages of Reform

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University of California Press, Apr 10, 2012 - Biography & Autobiography - 569 pages
“This book, the first scholarly consideration of Weill’s complete output of stage works, is without doubt the most important critical study of the composer’s oeuvre to date in any language. Hinton’s scholarship is superior and his insights original and illuminating. The product of several decades of engagement with Weill’s works, their sources and reception, as well as the secondary literature, the book is a stunning achievement. Brilliantly conceived and executed, it will take its place as one of the cornerstones of Weill studies.”—Kim H. Kowalke, University of Rochester and President, Kurt Weill Foundation for Music

“In Weill’s Musical Theater: Stages of Reform, Stephen Hinton reminds us that Kurt Weill was always a revolutionary. The composer’s insistent dedication to a provocative, constantly evolving lyric theater that spoke directly to audiences meant that Weill remained as controversial as he was popular. The celebrity that endeared him to Broadway made him anathema in Berlin. Some sixty years after Weill’s death, Hinton is finally able to demonstrate the consistent brilliance, theatrical power, and coherence of a composer who revolutionized every genre he touched (or used) and whose collaborators read as a who’s who of twentieth-century theater.”

—David Savran, author of Highbrow/Lowdown: Theater, Jazz, and the Making of the New Middle Class



"Stephen Hinton presents us with an image of Weill that is at once monumental yet still alive. A truly Protean figure, Weill is not an easy man to grasp in his totality; Brecht once wrote that a man thrown into water will have to develop webbed feet, and as a refugee from Nazi Germany, Weill had to become a cultural amphibian. But in Weill's Musical Theater we see the composer from every angle: through the gaze of countless critics and reviewers, through Weill's own eyes, and finally through the filter of Hinton's judicious, focused prose. This account will stand."—Daniel Albright, author of Untwisting the Serpent: Modernism in Music, Literature, and Other Arts
 

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Contents

Ferruccio Busoni with pupils from his Berlin master class c 1923 43
2
3
31
The Busoni Connection
37
4
38
Der Protagonist First Pantomime
65
oneAct operas
67
Der Protagonist First Pantomime
75
Royal Palace film sequence Dejaniras motif
84
richard Wagner Die Walküre act 3 scene 3
252
Musical Plays
261
Johnny Johnson Introduction
273
Der Kuhhandel Juans Lied
285
Lady in the Dark glamour Dream incipit of My Ship
302
Lady in the Dark This Is New end
303
One Touch of Venus Venus Awakening
314
One Touch of Venus Speak Low end
315

Der Zar lässt sich photographieren opening motto
91
Der Zar lässt sich photographieren motto in orchestra
92
Songspiel
94
Der Zar lässt sich photographieren the Czars entrance
106
Plays with Music
110
Happy End Der kleine Leutnant des lieben gottes allusion to Die Internationale
121
Der Silbersee Severins revenge aria
133
Der Silbersee Severins revenge aria end of refrain
134
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Die Zauberflöte act 1 finale
135
Der Silbersee Aufjener Strasse motif of illumination
137
Epic opera
138
Aufstieg und Fall der Stadt Mahagonny act 1 introduction of dance rhythms in opening
152
Die Bürgschaft chorale People do not change by themselves
155
Die Bürgschaft Fog Scene
162
Fast während seines ganzen Fluges hatte der Flieger mit Nebel zu kämpfen
163
Didactic Theater Lehrstück
176
Der Jasager conclusion
192
Stages of Exile
196
Die sieben Todsünden Prologue
207
Der Silbersee foxtrot for two bananas
208
Die sieben Todsünden Lust
209
Die sieben Todsünden Envy
210
Die sieben Todsünden Epilogue
211
A Kingdom for a Cow Prologue national anthem
233
The Eternal Road act 1 doubleaction scene
247
The Eternal Road act 1 Figaro allusion
248
The Eternal Road act 2 march theme
249
The Eternal Road act 2 Ring allusion sleep motif
251
One Touch of Venus Foolish Heart
316
One Touch of Venus A Stranger Here Myself
317
richard Wagner Götterdämmerung Prelude
319
Stage vs Screen
321
You and Me The right guy for Me conclusion of verse opening of refrain
339
American opera
360
Street Scene opening Lonely House motto
366
Street Scene conclusion fate motif
367
Street Scene Somehow I never could believe
375
Street Scene Somehow I never could believe
376
Street Scene Introduction bustle motif
377
Street Scene Introduction Moon Faced Starry Eyed
380
Pablo de Sarasate Introduction et Tarentelle op 43 opening
384
Down in the Valley The Lonesome Dove
398
Down in the Valley Down in the Valley
399
Down in the Valley underscored spoken dialogue flight motif
400
Down in the Valley opening fanfare
401
Concept and Commitment
403
Love Life Here Ill Stay bridge
417
Love Life Here Ill Stay opening autograph pianovocal score
418
Lost in the Stars The Hills of Ixopo opening
435
Lost in the Stars o tixo tixo Help Me conclusion
438
Coda
447
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Die Zauberflöte overture opening
454
Weills Works for Stage or Screen
473
Credits
543
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About the author (2012)

Stephen Hinton is Avalon Foundation Professor in the Humanities at Stanford University. His publications include Kurt Weill: The Threepenny Opera.

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