Saints and Citizens: Indigenous Histories of Colonial Missions and Mexican California

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Univ of California Press, 2014 - Architecture - 256 pages
Saints and Citizens is a bold new excavation of the history of Indigenous people in California in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, showing how the missions became sites of their authority, memory, and identity. Shining a forensic eye on colonial encounters in Chumash, Luiseño, and Yokuts territories, Lisbeth Haas depicts how native painters incorporated their cultural iconography in mission painting and how leaders harnessed new knowledge for control in other ways. Through her portrayal of highly varied societies, she explores the politics of Indigenous citizenship in the independent Mexican nation through events such as the Chumash War of 1824, native emancipation after 1826, and the political pursuit of Indigenous rights and land through 1848.
 

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Contents

Colonial Settlements on Indigenous Land
13
Colonial Sites and Indigenous Empires 174
42
Becoming Indian in Colonial California
50
Chumash Shell Beads
62
Dance of Indians at Mission in San José New California 1806
78
The Politics of the Image
83
A Chumash Painting of the Archangel Raphael
86
Chumash Plaster of Paris Image Bell Tower Mission Santa
105
Citizenship and the Patria
140
Indigenous Landowners and Native Ingenuity
164
Appendix
187
Notes
195
Bibliography
223
Index
247
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About the author (2014)

Lisbeth Haas is Professor of History at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and author of Pablo Tac, Indigenous Scholar: Writing on Luiseño Language and Colonial History, c. 1840 (UC Press, 2011) and Conquests and Historical Identities in California, 1769?1936 (UC Press, 1995).

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