Jacked Up and Unjust: Pacific Islander Teens Confront Violent Legacies

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Univ of California Press, Aug 23, 2016 - Social Science - 217 pages
In the context of two hundred years of American colonial control in the Pacific, Katherine Irwin and Karen Umemoto shed light on the experiences of today’s inner city and rural girls and boys in Hawai‘i who face racism, sexism, poverty, and political neglect. Basing their book on nine years of ethnographic research, the authors highlight how legacies of injustice endure, prompting teens to fight for dignity and the chance to thrive in America, a nation that the youth describe as inherently “jacked up”—rigged—and “unjust.” While the story begins with the youth battling multiple contingencies, it ends on a hopeful note with many of the teens overcoming numerous hardships, often with the guidance of steadfast, caring adults.
 

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Contents

Outspoken Femininity
40
High School Girls Struggles for Respect
60
Boys Fights and the JackedUp System
86
Juvenile Protection in
105
Youth Prepare for Adulthood
126
Theoretical Conclusions
148
Compassionate and Constructive Policy and Practice
163
Data Sources and Participant Demographics
177
References
193
Index
213
Copyright

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About the author (2016)

Katherine Irwin is Professor of Sociology at the University of Hawai'i, Manoa. She is the coauthor with Meda Chesney-Lind of Beyond Bad Girls: Gender, Violence, and Hype.

Karen Umemoto is Professor of Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Hawai'i, Manoa. She is the author of The Truce: Lessons from an L.A. Gang War.

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