Punishing Disease: HIV and the Criminalization of Sickness

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Univ of California Press, 2018 - Social Science - 275 pages
From the very beginning of the epidemic, AIDS was linked to punishment. Calls to punish people living with HIV—mostly stigmatized minorities—began before doctors had even settled on a name for the disease. Punitive attitudes toward AIDS prompted lawmakers around the country to introduce legislation aimed at criminalizing the behaviors of people living with HIV. Punishing Disease explains how this happened—and its consequences. With the door to criminalizing sickness now open, what other ailments will follow? As lawmakers move to tack on additional diseases such as hepatitis and meningitis to existing law, the question is more than academic.
 

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Contents

AIDS in the Shadow
1
part one punitive disease control
15
HIV Stops with Me
43
The Public Health Police
68
part two the criminalization of sickness
99
HIV on Trial
132
Victim Impact
158
Conclusion Punishing Disease
188
On Analyzing the Anatomy
209
State HIV Bills 216 Notes
221
Index
263
Copyright

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About the author (2018)

Trevor Hoppe is Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University at Albany, State University of New York, and a coeditor of The War on Sex.

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