Scale: Discourse and Dimensions of Social Life

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E. Summerson Carr, Michael Lempert
Univ of California Press, Aug 18, 2016 - Social Science - 261 pages
A free ebook version of this title is available through Luminos, University of California Press’s Open Access publishing program for monographs. Visit www.luminosoa.org to learn more.
Wherever we turn, we see diverse things scaled for us, from cities to economies, from history to love. We know scale by many names and through many familiar antinomies: local and global,micro and macroevents to name a few. Even the most critical among us often proceed with our analysis as if such scales were the ready-made platforms of social life, rather than asking how, why, and to what effect are scalar distinctions forged in the first place.
 
How do scalar distinctions help actors and analysts alike make sense of and navigate their social worlds? What do these distinctions reveal and what do they conceal? How are scales construed and what effects do they have on the way those who abide by them think and act? This pathbreaking volume attends to the practical labor of scale-making and the communicative practices this labor requires. From an ethnographic perspective, the authors demonstrate that scale is practice and process before it becomes product, whether in the work of projecting the commons, claiming access to the big picture, or scaling the seriousness of a crime.
 
 

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Contents

Aura and Oratory in William Jennings
25
How Buddhist Debate Became
52
Shrinking Indigenous Language in the Yukon
70
Comparison and Perspective
91
Balancing the Scales of Justice in Tonga
112
Interscaling Awe Deescalating Disaster
133
Scaling Red and the Horror of Trademark
159
Semiotic Vinification and the Scaling of Taste
185
Scales and ScaleClimbing as Ideological Projects
213
Acknowledgments
233
Contributors
251
Copyright

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About the author (2016)

E. Summerson Carr is Associate Professor, School of Social Service Administration, University of Chicago.



Michael Lempert is Associate Professor of Anthropology, University of Michigan.

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