Moving by the Spirit: Pentecostal Social Life on the Zambian Copperbelt

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Univ of California Press, Mar 28, 2017 - Social Science - 194 pages
"This book argues that the runaway popularity of Pentecostal Christianity on the Zambian Copperbelt is a result of this religion's capacity to produce novel forms of value realization. A close analysis of the relationships that form in Pentecostal churches reveals that Pentecostal social life is structured around an animating idea - a value - called 'moving by the Spirit.' Moving by the Spirit entails personal advancement both with regard to material prosperity and religious skill or charisma. While moving by the Spirit makes Pentecostalism attractive, it is difficult for Pentecostal believers to balance prosperity against charisma without reproducing divisions in economic status. These divisions undermine the social world of the church by limiting the access of poorer believers to the relationships with their leaders - relationships through which the value of moving by the Spirit is most effectively realized"--Provided by publisher.
 

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Contents

Pentecostalism as Promise
1
Boom and Bust Revival and Renewal
19
Making Moving Happen
37
Becoming Pentecostal on the Copperbelt
57
Ritual and the Unmaking of the Pentecostal
74
Prosperity Charisma and the Problem of Gender
92
On the Potential and Problems of Pentecostal Exchange
110
Mending Mothers Kitchen
144
Worlds That Flourish
159
Notes
167
References Cited
177
Index
191
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About the author (2017)

Naomi Haynes is a Chancellor's Fellow and Lecturer in Social Anthropology at the University of Edinburgh. She is coeditor of the Current Anthropology special issue The Anthropology of Christianity: Unity, Diversity, New Directions and of the Social Analysis special issue Hierarchy, Values, and the Value of Hierarchy. She is also co-curator of the Anthropology of Christianity Bibliographic Blog at www.anthrocybib.net.

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