Empire's Tracks: Indigenous Nations, Chinese Workers, and the Transcontinental Railroad

Front Cover
Univ of California Press, Jan 29, 2019 - History - 320 pages
Empire’s Tracks boldly reframes the history of the transcontinental railroad from the perspectives of the Cheyenne, Lakota, and Pawnee Native American tribes, and the Chinese migrants who toiled on its path. In this meticulously researched book, Manu Karuka situates the railroad within the violent global histories of colonialism and capitalism. Through an examination of legislative, military, and business records, Karuka deftly explains the imperial foundations of U.S. political economy. Tracing the shared paths of Indigenous and Asian American histories, this multisited interdisciplinary study connects military occupation to exclusionary border policies, a linked chain spanning the heart of U.S. imperialism. This highly original and beautifully wrought book unveils how the transcontinental railroad laid the tracks of the U.S. Empire.
 
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The Prose of Countersovereignty
1
and 2 Railroad Colonialism
38
and 4 Lakota Nation
58
and 6 Chinese Workers
80
and 8 Pawnee Nation
102
Pawnee
104
and 10 Cheyenne Nation
126
Cheyenne
128
Shareholder Whiteness
149
Continental Imperialism
168
The Significance of Decolonization
185
Acknowledgments
201
Bibliography
255
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2019)

Manu Karuka is Assistant Professor of American Studies at Barnard College.

Bibliographic information