Collisions at the Crossroads: How Place and Mobility Make Race

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Univ of California Press, Apr 16, 2019 - History - 392 pages
There are few places where mobility has shaped identity as widely as the American West, but some locations and populations sit at its major crossroads, maintaining control over place and mobility, labor and race. In Collisions at the Crossroads, Genevieve Carpio argues that mobility, both permission to move freely and prohibitions on movement, helped shape racial formation in the eastern suburbs of Los Angeles and the Inland Empire throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. By examining policies and forces as different as historical societies, Indian boarding schools, bicycle ordinances, immigration policy, incarceration, traffic checkpoints, and Route 66 heritage, she shows how local authorities constructed a racial hierarchy by allowing some people to move freely while placing limits on the mobility of others. Highlighting the ways people of color have negotiated their place within these systems, Carpio reveals a compelling and perceptive analysis of spatial mobility through physical movement and residence.
 
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
The Rise of the Anglo Fantasy Past
22
From Mexican Settlers to Mexican Birds of Passage
102
Del Fotingo Que Era Mio
141
Filipino lettuce cutters Photo by Dorothea Lange Last West Stoop Labor
165
From Citrus Belt to Inland Empire
181
Carol Ann and Barry ca 1945
182
Gonzales family at visiting day for California Institution for Men
216
Faux historical signage at Victoria Gardens Rancho Cucamonga 2018
229
Notes
239
Bibliography
311
Index
339
Copyright

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About the author (2019)

Genevieve Carpio is Assistant Professor of Chicana and Chicano Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles. 

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