Dematerialization: Art and Design in Latin America

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Univ of California Press, Mar 3, 2020 - Art - 256 pages
Dematerialization examines the intertwined experimental practices and critical discourses of art and industrial design in Argentina, Mexico, and Chile in the 1960s and 1970s. Provocative in nature, this book investigates the way that artists, critics, and designers considered the relationship between the crisis of the modernist concept of artistic medium and the radical social transformation brought about by the accelerated capitalist development of the preceding decades. Beginning with Oscar Masotta’s sui generis definition of the term, Karen Benezra proposes dematerialization as a concept that allows us to see how disputes over the materiality of the art and design object functioned in order to address questions concerning the role of appearance, myth, and ideology in the dynamic logic structuring social relations in contemporary discussions of aesthetics, artistic collectivism, and industrial design. Dematerialization brings new insights to the fields of contemporary art history, critical theory, and Latin American cultural studies.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
3
62
NOTES
169

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About the author (2020)

Karen Benezra is Assistant Professor in the Department of Latin American and Iberian Cultures at Columbia University and an editor of ArtMargins.

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