Made in Britain: Nation and Emigration in Nineteenth-Century America

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Univ of California Press, 2020 - Americans - 320 pages
The United States was made in Britain. For over a hundred years following independence, a diverse and lively crowd of emigrant Americans left the United States for Britain. From Liverpool and London, they produced Atlantic capitalism and managed transfers of goods, culture, and capital that were integral to US nation-building. In British social clubs, emigrants forged relationships with elite Britons that were essential not only to tranquil transatlantic connections, but also to fighting southern slavery. As the United States descended into Civil War, emigrant Americans decisively shaped the Atlantic-wide battle for public opinion. Equally revered as informal ambassadors and feared as anti-republican contagions, these emigrants raised troubling questions about the relationship between nationhood, nationality, and foreign connection.

Blending the histories of foreign relations, capitalism, nation-formation, and transnational connection, Stephen Tuffnell compellingly demonstrates that the United States' struggle toward independent nationhood was entangled at every step with the world's most powerful empire of the time. With deep research and vivid detail, Made in Britain uncovers this hidden story and presents a bold new perspective on nineteenth-century trans-Atlantic relations.
 

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Contents

American Invaders
1
Independence and Interdependence
7
Representative Americans
56
The Emigrants
92
Empire Philanthropy Public Diplomacy
115
American Invasions
141
Emigrants Americanizers Colonizers
184
Notes
193
Bibliography
257
Index
291
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About the author (2020)

Stephen Tuffnell is Associate Professor of Modern U.S. History at St. Peter's College, Oxford University. He is coeditor, with Dr. Benjamin Mountford, of A Global History of Gold Rushes.

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