Blood and Water: The Indus River Basin in Modern History

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Univ of California Press, Apr 14, 2020 - 376 pages
The Indus basin was once an arid pastoral watershed, but by the second half of the twentieth century, it had become one of the world's most heavily irrigated and populated river basins. Launched under British colonial rule in the nineteenth century, this irrigation project spurred political, social, and environmental transformations that continued after the 1947 creation of the new states of India and Pakistan. In this first large-scale environmental history of the region, David Gilmartin focuses on the changes that occurred in the basin as a result of the implementation of the world's largest modern integrated irrigation system. This masterful work of scholarship explores how environmental transformation is tied to the creation of communities and nations, focusing on the intersection of politics, statecraft, and the environment.
 

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Contents

Debating the Politics of Natures Transformation
2
IRRIGATION AND THE BALOCH FRONTIER
27
British Irrigation and the Myth of the Baloch Frontier
40
Empire Irrigation and Tribal Identity
62
Commons Aridity Pastoralism
80
Territory and Taxation
96
STATUTE AND CUSTOM IN WATER LAW
104
Water Lords
126
Visions of EnvironmentVisions of Community
167
THE RIVER BASIN AND PARTITION
182
Nationalism Water and the Partition of the Indus Basin
198
THE INDUS WATERS TREATY AND ITS AFTERLIVES
220
Statecraft and Local Community in an Evolving System
235
Notes
253
Bibliography
321
Index
339

SCIENCE THE STATE AND THE ENVIRONMENT
144

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About the author (2020)

David Gilmartin is Distinguished Professor of History at North Carolina State University and the author of Empire and Islam: Punjab and the Making of Pakistan.

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